2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165761
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of a Complementary Therapy Hospital Internship Program
Author(s):
Norton, Vicki
Author Details:
Vicki Norton, Park Nicollet Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA
Abstract:
Oncology patients are seeking complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) along with their medical regimes for the relief of symptoms such as nausea, pain, and anxiety. It is challenging for nurse managers to address patient requests for CAM in a caring, competent, and fiscally responsible manner. A pilot program was initiated with healing touch and reflexology interns to: 1) provide CAM services for hospitalized oncology patients, 2) measure the effectiveness of the services with a pre- and post-treatment questionnaire, and 3) give the interns the hours of practicum needed to receive certification in their CAM specialty. A certified healing touch practitioner and a certified reflexology practitioner served as mentors/supervisors for these interns. Participants were recruited from a 51-bed oncology and medical/surgical unit. All participants signed an informed consent prior to treatment. Reflexology treatments were given a total of 113 times to 65 patients (the certification practicum includes treating patients multiple times) and 83 healing touch treatments were given to 65 patients. Patients rated their pain, nausea, stress, anxiety, fear, and depression both before and within 30 minutes after CAM treatment on a symptom intensity scale from 0 (no symptom) to 10 (unbearable symptom). Symptom intensity scales have been previously validated in assessing pain and nausea. Patients also rated their well-being and sense of peacefulness in a similar fashion. Results were analyzed using the Mantel-Haenzel chi-square tests to compare differences in proportions and Wilcoxon signed rank test to analyze the change in symptom ratings from pre- to post-tests. P-values (two-tailed) of less than .05 were considered statistically significant. Mean levels of pain, nausea, stress, anxiety, fear, and depression dropped significantly (p < .0001, all measures) after healing touch and reflexology. Ratings of well-being and peacefulness improved significantly after treatment (p < .0001, all measures). Males and females both received benefits from the program. All patients surveyed would recommend these treatments to fellow patients. These results support the value of a CAM internship program in providing symptom management and patient comfort for oncology patients in the hospital setting.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of a Complementary Therapy Hospital Internship Programen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNorton, Vickien_US
dc.author.detailsVicki Norton, Park Nicollet Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165761-
dc.description.abstractOncology patients are seeking complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) along with their medical regimes for the relief of symptoms such as nausea, pain, and anxiety. It is challenging for nurse managers to address patient requests for CAM in a caring, competent, and fiscally responsible manner. A pilot program was initiated with healing touch and reflexology interns to: 1) provide CAM services for hospitalized oncology patients, 2) measure the effectiveness of the services with a pre- and post-treatment questionnaire, and 3) give the interns the hours of practicum needed to receive certification in their CAM specialty. A certified healing touch practitioner and a certified reflexology practitioner served as mentors/supervisors for these interns. Participants were recruited from a 51-bed oncology and medical/surgical unit. All participants signed an informed consent prior to treatment. Reflexology treatments were given a total of 113 times to 65 patients (the certification practicum includes treating patients multiple times) and 83 healing touch treatments were given to 65 patients. Patients rated their pain, nausea, stress, anxiety, fear, and depression both before and within 30 minutes after CAM treatment on a symptom intensity scale from 0 (no symptom) to 10 (unbearable symptom). Symptom intensity scales have been previously validated in assessing pain and nausea. Patients also rated their well-being and sense of peacefulness in a similar fashion. Results were analyzed using the Mantel-Haenzel chi-square tests to compare differences in proportions and Wilcoxon signed rank test to analyze the change in symptom ratings from pre- to post-tests. P-values (two-tailed) of less than .05 were considered statistically significant. Mean levels of pain, nausea, stress, anxiety, fear, and depression dropped significantly (p &lt; .0001, all measures) after healing touch and reflexology. Ratings of well-being and peacefulness improved significantly after treatment (p &lt; .0001, all measures). Males and females both received benefits from the program. All patients surveyed would recommend these treatments to fellow patients. These results support the value of a CAM internship program in providing symptom management and patient comfort for oncology patients in the hospital setting.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:24:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:24:25Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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