2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165763
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Conquering Cancer Pain in the Emergency Center: Strategies and Outcomes
Author(s):
Ho, Tuong-Vi
Author Details:
Tuong-Vi Ho, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA
Abstract:
Pain is one of the most common side effects of cancer substantially effecting the quality of life of cancer patients. Pain was also the second most common chief complaint that prompted patients to visit our emergency center (EC) last year. Assessing patient pain, developing and implementing plans of care, and evaluating pain management outcomes are vital in keeping up with our goal to provide quality care to our oncology patients. With the fast pace, quick patient turnover times, and lack of direct follow-up in the EC, pain management can be even more challenging for nurses in this setting. Thus, accurate patient assessment and innovative measures for intervention are needed. The purpose of this retrospective study was to identify nurse skills and patterns of pain assessment, to identify areas for improvement, to develop effective interventions, and to evaluate patient pain control outcomes. Records from 299 oncology patients seen in the EC in January 2000 were reviewed. One hundred (33%) of these patients reported a pain level between zero and three on a 10-point scale and 124 (42%) complained of pain at a level of four or higher at the time of triage. Nurses documented pain assessment for 44 (35%) of these 124 patients. Seventy-five (25%) of all 299 patients did not have any documentation to reflect pain assessment at their triage or exit times. Our results indicated that the EC staff should be further educated on cancer-related pain issues, accurate pain assessment, and interventions for pain control. Thus interventions were developed to increase patient and nurse awareness of pain standards, accurate pain assessments, and pain control measures. Those interventions consist of staff inservices, poster presentations, chart reviews, patient education pamphlets, pain scale posted in rooms, more in-depth pain assessment documentation, and medical staff notification of patient with pain level of four or higher at the time of triage. Currently the effectiveness of those pain interventions is being evaluated. As healthcare providers helping patients to control their pain, we can actually contribute to our patient efforts in maintaining a good quality of life while battling their cancer illnesses.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleConquering Cancer Pain in the Emergency Center: Strategies and Outcomesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHo, Tuong-Vien_US
dc.author.detailsTuong-Vi Ho, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165763-
dc.description.abstractPain is one of the most common side effects of cancer substantially effecting the quality of life of cancer patients. Pain was also the second most common chief complaint that prompted patients to visit our emergency center (EC) last year. Assessing patient pain, developing and implementing plans of care, and evaluating pain management outcomes are vital in keeping up with our goal to provide quality care to our oncology patients. With the fast pace, quick patient turnover times, and lack of direct follow-up in the EC, pain management can be even more challenging for nurses in this setting. Thus, accurate patient assessment and innovative measures for intervention are needed. The purpose of this retrospective study was to identify nurse skills and patterns of pain assessment, to identify areas for improvement, to develop effective interventions, and to evaluate patient pain control outcomes. Records from 299 oncology patients seen in the EC in January 2000 were reviewed. One hundred (33%) of these patients reported a pain level between zero and three on a 10-point scale and 124 (42%) complained of pain at a level of four or higher at the time of triage. Nurses documented pain assessment for 44 (35%) of these 124 patients. Seventy-five (25%) of all 299 patients did not have any documentation to reflect pain assessment at their triage or exit times. Our results indicated that the EC staff should be further educated on cancer-related pain issues, accurate pain assessment, and interventions for pain control. Thus interventions were developed to increase patient and nurse awareness of pain standards, accurate pain assessments, and pain control measures. Those interventions consist of staff inservices, poster presentations, chart reviews, patient education pamphlets, pain scale posted in rooms, more in-depth pain assessment documentation, and medical staff notification of patient with pain level of four or higher at the time of triage. Currently the effectiveness of those pain interventions is being evaluated. As healthcare providers helping patients to control their pain, we can actually contribute to our patient efforts in maintaining a good quality of life while battling their cancer illnesses.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:24:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:24:27Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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