2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165768
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Educating Medical-Surgical Nurses in Neutropenia Associated With Cancer
Author(s):
Hoyett, Faye
Author Details:
Faye Hoyett, University Hospital Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, USA
Abstract:
Patients with neoplastic diseases often experience neutropenia and/or febrile neutropenia (FN). Defined by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) as an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) below 2,000 cells/mm3, these patients are at high risk for various infections and multi-organ failure. Indeed, one of the leading causes of cancer-related morbidity/mortality is sepsis. Between October 1999 and July 2001, approximately 100 patients were admitted to hospitals with fever related to cancer. Because these patients are sometimes admitted to general medical/surgical (M/S) units, many issues arise related to their care. M/S nurses frequently express their anxieties at caring for cancer patients, feeling inadequate for the in-depth assessment skills required. To assist in alleviating their anxieties and improving their assessment skills in the realm of oncology nursing, the University of Alabama at Birmingham Oncology Education Committee developed a program for M/S nurses to address the definition and incidence of neutropenia and its management. Objectives included defining neutropenia and its causes, discussing the implications of, and risk for, infections in the neutropenic patient, and identifying measures for neutropenic/FN patient management and patient/caregiver education. Neutrophil development and function was discussed. Causes of cancer-related neutropenia were discussed. Attendees were instructed in ANC calculation and the implications for levels of neutropenia. Recognizing patients at risk for developing neutropenia and/or FN was a major focus. Nurses were educated in neutropenic precautions as defined by the University Hospital Nursing Standard of Care Policy Manual. Patient instruction sheets for the prevention of infection were discussed and made available to the staff. The importance of patients and their caregivers utilizing good infection control practices was emphasized. Twenty-five nurses participated in this March 2001 program. Case study teaching was utilized to provide nurses with a method to integrate information into daily clinical practice and evaluate their comprehension of material at the end of the program. Overall objectives were achieved, demonstrated by an evaluation score of 4.85 of a possible five. A six-month follow-up is planned using a questionnaire to determine retained learning after six months. At that point, further education will be developed based on an assessment of knowledge retention.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEducating Medical-Surgical Nurses in Neutropenia Associated With Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorHoyett, Fayeen_US
dc.author.detailsFaye Hoyett, University Hospital Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165768-
dc.description.abstractPatients with neoplastic diseases often experience neutropenia and/or febrile neutropenia (FN). Defined by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) as an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) below 2,000 cells/mm3, these patients are at high risk for various infections and multi-organ failure. Indeed, one of the leading causes of cancer-related morbidity/mortality is sepsis. Between October 1999 and July 2001, approximately 100 patients were admitted to hospitals with fever related to cancer. Because these patients are sometimes admitted to general medical/surgical (M/S) units, many issues arise related to their care. M/S nurses frequently express their anxieties at caring for cancer patients, feeling inadequate for the in-depth assessment skills required. To assist in alleviating their anxieties and improving their assessment skills in the realm of oncology nursing, the University of Alabama at Birmingham Oncology Education Committee developed a program for M/S nurses to address the definition and incidence of neutropenia and its management. Objectives included defining neutropenia and its causes, discussing the implications of, and risk for, infections in the neutropenic patient, and identifying measures for neutropenic/FN patient management and patient/caregiver education. Neutrophil development and function was discussed. Causes of cancer-related neutropenia were discussed. Attendees were instructed in ANC calculation and the implications for levels of neutropenia. Recognizing patients at risk for developing neutropenia and/or FN was a major focus. Nurses were educated in neutropenic precautions as defined by the University Hospital Nursing Standard of Care Policy Manual. Patient instruction sheets for the prevention of infection were discussed and made available to the staff. The importance of patients and their caregivers utilizing good infection control practices was emphasized. Twenty-five nurses participated in this March 2001 program. Case study teaching was utilized to provide nurses with a method to integrate information into daily clinical practice and evaluate their comprehension of material at the end of the program. Overall objectives were achieved, demonstrated by an evaluation score of 4.85 of a possible five. A six-month follow-up is planned using a questionnaire to determine retained learning after six months. At that point, further education will be developed based on an assessment of knowledge retention.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:24:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:24:33Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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