2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165771
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Increased Intracranial Pressure (ICP): A Headache for Oncology Nurses
Author(s):
Baumgartner, Karen
Author Details:
Karen Baumgartner, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA
Abstract:
It is expected that 180,000 brain tumors (including both primary and metastatic brain tumors) will be diagnosed in the United States during 2001. It is therefore critical that oncology nurses have an understanding of neurological problems associated with brain tumors. At M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, the inpatient neuro-oncology unit underwent an almost complete turnover in licensed nursing staff in one year. The unit manager and the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) identified several competency areas for the new nurses to master including performance of a basic neurological assessment and assessment of a patient for signs and symptoms of increased intracranial pressure (ICP). With this in mind, this author proposed to the CNS an educational intervention to increase new nurses' knowledge of the patient experiencing a critical change secondary to increased ICP. A self-study module was developed utilizing the Brain Trauma Foundation's evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with head injury as a foundation. The module included a pre-test, a written module, a post-test, and an overall evaluation. In a pilot study, four new neuro-oncology nurses completed this module during their orientation. Their mean percentage of correct scores was 60% before the module, and it was increased to 90% (minimum score, 80%) after the module. The written module was revised based on the evaluations to include more specific information on the pathophysiology of increased ICP. This module will be utilized by other registered nurses in this institution after obtaining continuing education credit. This self-study module is a useful tool for oncology nurses to improve their knowledge of a potential oncologic emergency. Early recognition of signs and symptoms of increased ICP is critical to preventing neurological decline, and even death, in patients with metastatic or primary brain tumors. Oncology nurses may find the use of this self-study module helpful in obtaining basic knowledge of increased ICP.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIncreased Intracranial Pressure (ICP): A Headache for Oncology Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBaumgartner, Karenen_US
dc.author.detailsKaren Baumgartner, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165771-
dc.description.abstractIt is expected that 180,000 brain tumors (including both primary and metastatic brain tumors) will be diagnosed in the United States during 2001. It is therefore critical that oncology nurses have an understanding of neurological problems associated with brain tumors. At M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, the inpatient neuro-oncology unit underwent an almost complete turnover in licensed nursing staff in one year. The unit manager and the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) identified several competency areas for the new nurses to master including performance of a basic neurological assessment and assessment of a patient for signs and symptoms of increased intracranial pressure (ICP). With this in mind, this author proposed to the CNS an educational intervention to increase new nurses' knowledge of the patient experiencing a critical change secondary to increased ICP. A self-study module was developed utilizing the Brain Trauma Foundation's evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with head injury as a foundation. The module included a pre-test, a written module, a post-test, and an overall evaluation. In a pilot study, four new neuro-oncology nurses completed this module during their orientation. Their mean percentage of correct scores was 60% before the module, and it was increased to 90% (minimum score, 80%) after the module. The written module was revised based on the evaluations to include more specific information on the pathophysiology of increased ICP. This module will be utilized by other registered nurses in this institution after obtaining continuing education credit. This self-study module is a useful tool for oncology nurses to improve their knowledge of a potential oncologic emergency. Early recognition of signs and symptoms of increased ICP is critical to preventing neurological decline, and even death, in patients with metastatic or primary brain tumors. Oncology nurses may find the use of this self-study module helpful in obtaining basic knowledge of increased ICP.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:24:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:24:36Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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