2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165814
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Appalachian women’s breast health knowledge and self care behaviors
Author(s):
Leslie, Nan
Author Details:
Nan Leslie, PhD, Associate Professor, West Virginia University School of Nursing, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA, email: nleslie@hsc.wvu.edu
Abstract:
Although there has been an overall decline in breast cancer mortality in the past decade, breast cancer continues to be the most common malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer deaths among American women. Decline in breast cancer mortality is probably due to earlier detection and improved treatment of the disease. To enable or accelerate the downward breast cancer mortality trend, women's awareness and understanding of the disease as well as their own self care practices must be promoted. This paper is a report of the first phase of a randomized clinical trial, funded by NINR, in which breast cancer knowledge, personal screening practices and perceived breast care proficiency among 185 Appalachian women were examined. The purpose of this 3 year longitudinal study is to improve women's breast health self care through interventions aimed at enhancing breast examination proficiency. In the first phase of this study, research questions have focused on the participants' knowledge and motivation, breast screening practices, and perception of their own abilities to perform breast self examination (BSE). Women in the study tended to be middle aged, married, and well educated. About 40% had a family member and 15% had a first degree relative with breast cancer; almost everyone knew someone with the disease. Minority women tended to be more fatalistic about the disease than Caucasian women. Education influenced knowledge about breast cancer and screening behaviors while marital status influenced motivational factors to practice BSE. About 1/4 of women reported having learned BSE on their own and 16% related that they never received BSE instruction. Despite the fact that most women felt that breast cancer can be detected early through BSE and felt that they should be involved in their own health care, few reported doing BSE regularly or performing the full scope of BSE activities. Many women attributed lack of BSE performance to having never been shown how to do the exam. Women denied that they themselves were adverse to touching their breasts, that BSE made them worry about breast cancer, that their chances were less than contracting the disease, or that they could abdicate BSE because they had an annual clinical exam. They did, however, attribute lack of BSE in others to discomfort with touching their own breasts (92%), worry about breast cancer (91%), and lack of confidence and ability to detect breast changes (95%). Only about _ of women in the study knew the best time to perform premenopausal BSE, and less than half knew when to do BSE after menopause. Most women (75%) knew that disease risk increases with age, and that disease incidence is positively associated with dietary factors. Despite widespread efforts to increase women's awareness about breast cancer and the need for early detection and treatment, health care professionals continue to face the challenge of encouraging women to take charge of their breast health care.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAppalachian women’s breast health knowledge and self care behaviorsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLeslie, Nanen_US
dc.author.detailsNan Leslie, PhD, Associate Professor, West Virginia University School of Nursing, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA, email: nleslie@hsc.wvu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165814-
dc.description.abstractAlthough there has been an overall decline in breast cancer mortality in the past decade, breast cancer continues to be the most common malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer deaths among American women. Decline in breast cancer mortality is probably due to earlier detection and improved treatment of the disease. To enable or accelerate the downward breast cancer mortality trend, women's awareness and understanding of the disease as well as their own self care practices must be promoted. This paper is a report of the first phase of a randomized clinical trial, funded by NINR, in which breast cancer knowledge, personal screening practices and perceived breast care proficiency among 185 Appalachian women were examined. The purpose of this 3 year longitudinal study is to improve women's breast health self care through interventions aimed at enhancing breast examination proficiency. In the first phase of this study, research questions have focused on the participants' knowledge and motivation, breast screening practices, and perception of their own abilities to perform breast self examination (BSE). Women in the study tended to be middle aged, married, and well educated. About 40% had a family member and 15% had a first degree relative with breast cancer; almost everyone knew someone with the disease. Minority women tended to be more fatalistic about the disease than Caucasian women. Education influenced knowledge about breast cancer and screening behaviors while marital status influenced motivational factors to practice BSE. About 1/4 of women reported having learned BSE on their own and 16% related that they never received BSE instruction. Despite the fact that most women felt that breast cancer can be detected early through BSE and felt that they should be involved in their own health care, few reported doing BSE regularly or performing the full scope of BSE activities. Many women attributed lack of BSE performance to having never been shown how to do the exam. Women denied that they themselves were adverse to touching their breasts, that BSE made them worry about breast cancer, that their chances were less than contracting the disease, or that they could abdicate BSE because they had an annual clinical exam. They did, however, attribute lack of BSE in others to discomfort with touching their own breasts (92%), worry about breast cancer (91%), and lack of confidence and ability to detect breast changes (95%). Only about _ of women in the study knew the best time to perform premenopausal BSE, and less than half knew when to do BSE after menopause. Most women (75%) knew that disease risk increases with age, and that disease incidence is positively associated with dietary factors. Despite widespread efforts to increase women's awareness about breast cancer and the need for early detection and treatment, health care professionals continue to face the challenge of encouraging women to take charge of their breast health care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:34:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:34:14Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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