2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165815
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The relationship of fatigue and depression among HIV-positive gay men
Author(s):
Barroso, Julie
Author Details:
Julie Barroso, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: julie_barroso@unc.edu
Abstract:
HIV-related fatigue is one of the most prevalent and troubling symptoms facing seropositive people, particularly now that HIV infection is a chronic, manageable illness. The first wave of research on this subject has pointed to a variety of possible psychological and physiologic factors that may be linked to HIV-related fatigue. The first aim of this study was to determine whether depression plays a greater role in predicting fatigue than fatigue does in predicting depression in a cohort of HIV-positive gay men who have been followed longitudinally for up to 7 1/2 years. A second aim was to determine whether psychological and psychosocial variables (depression, anxiety, and lack of social support) predict fatigue better than physiologic variables (CD4 count, CDC clinical status, hemoglobin and hematocrit). These aims are addressed with the use of "observation-driven" logistic regression models for predicting fatigue and depression as functions of past fatigue and depression, and other psychological and physiologic variables. The sample consisted of 36 HIV-positive gay men, who were all asymptomatic at study entry. Subjects are admitted to the General Clinical Research Center at a hospital twice a year, and physiologic and psychological data are gathered. Instruments reported on here include the Profile of Mood States (as a measure of anxiety, depression, and fatigue), the Beck Hopelessness Scale, the Coping and Change Questionnaire, and the Sarason Brief Social Support Questionnaire. The prevalence of fatigue and depression for the men at study entry were 26.0% and 31.3%, respectively. Depression was strongly correlated with prior depression, and fatigue was strongly correlated with prior fatigue. Also, depression predicted fatigue, and fatigue predicted depression. Those with fatigue 6 months earlier had 1.99 times greater odds to be depressed than those not fatigued 6 months earlier. Those with depression 6 months earlier had 1.97 times greater odds to be fatigued than those not depressed 6 months earlier. Only CDC clinical status C was a significant predictor of fatigue. Both anxiety and hopelessness were significant predictors of depression, whereas only anxiety predicted fatigue. These results suggest that for HIV-positive gay men, fatigue and depression have similar effects on one another. In sum, fatigue had both physiologic and psychological risk factors, whereas depression was found to have only psychological risk factors.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe relationship of fatigue and depression among HIV-positive gay menen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarroso, Julieen_US
dc.author.detailsJulie Barroso, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: julie_barroso@unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165815-
dc.description.abstractHIV-related fatigue is one of the most prevalent and troubling symptoms facing seropositive people, particularly now that HIV infection is a chronic, manageable illness. The first wave of research on this subject has pointed to a variety of possible psychological and physiologic factors that may be linked to HIV-related fatigue. The first aim of this study was to determine whether depression plays a greater role in predicting fatigue than fatigue does in predicting depression in a cohort of HIV-positive gay men who have been followed longitudinally for up to 7 1/2 years. A second aim was to determine whether psychological and psychosocial variables (depression, anxiety, and lack of social support) predict fatigue better than physiologic variables (CD4 count, CDC clinical status, hemoglobin and hematocrit). These aims are addressed with the use of "observation-driven" logistic regression models for predicting fatigue and depression as functions of past fatigue and depression, and other psychological and physiologic variables. The sample consisted of 36 HIV-positive gay men, who were all asymptomatic at study entry. Subjects are admitted to the General Clinical Research Center at a hospital twice a year, and physiologic and psychological data are gathered. Instruments reported on here include the Profile of Mood States (as a measure of anxiety, depression, and fatigue), the Beck Hopelessness Scale, the Coping and Change Questionnaire, and the Sarason Brief Social Support Questionnaire. The prevalence of fatigue and depression for the men at study entry were 26.0% and 31.3%, respectively. Depression was strongly correlated with prior depression, and fatigue was strongly correlated with prior fatigue. Also, depression predicted fatigue, and fatigue predicted depression. Those with fatigue 6 months earlier had 1.99 times greater odds to be depressed than those not fatigued 6 months earlier. Those with depression 6 months earlier had 1.97 times greater odds to be fatigued than those not depressed 6 months earlier. Only CDC clinical status C was a significant predictor of fatigue. Both anxiety and hopelessness were significant predictors of depression, whereas only anxiety predicted fatigue. These results suggest that for HIV-positive gay men, fatigue and depression have similar effects on one another. In sum, fatigue had both physiologic and psychological risk factors, whereas depression was found to have only psychological risk factors.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:34:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:34:16Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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