2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165816
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Searching and retrieving in qualitative research
Author(s):
Barroso, Julie
Author Details:
Julie Barroso, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: julie_barroso@unc.edu
Abstract:
The explosion of information in the health sciences and the expanded availability of electronic citation databases now challenge researchers to find relevant information in an organized, efficient, focused, systematic, and thorough manner. Complicating search and retrieval for researchers interested in finding qualitative studies are issues related to qualitative research itself, which often crosses highly disparate disciplines, each of which employ their own language for identifying relevant literature. The databases containing the work of these varied disciplines have idiosyncratic features that searchers must know. Qualitative research encompasses highly disparate methodologies for which no uniform language exists. Moreover, the "experiences" that qualitative research emphasizes are themselves permeable and amorphous and, therefore, resistant to transformation into key terms. Searching for and retrieving qualitative studies thus requires retrofitting two apparently incompatible entities: the medium of the computer with the message of qualitative research. The comprehensive retrieval of relevant studies in a selected domain is especially vital to the integrity and validity of individual qualitative projects -- too many of which are still being conducted in the mistaken belief that no studies were previously conducted in the areas targeted in these projects -- and to projects directed toward systematically synthesizing the findings from these studies for use in practice. The purpose of this paper is to share the problems we faced while engaged in the search and retrieval process for qualitative studies on women with HIV/AIDS in a larger methodological study aimed at developing a protocol to conduct qualitative metasynthesis, and our solutions for these problems. We found that what we initially thought were clear boundaries for searching required our explicitly excluding certain phenomena and/or reconceptualizing what we meant by our search terms. For example, in the technical world of search and retrieval, AIDS is not only an infection, but also a category of assistive devices, as in hearing and speech aids. The use of the term "female" yielded a study on a transsexual person's experience of HIV/AIDS and thus forced us to reconsider what we meant by female experience; was it the experience of genetic females or persons living as females we were after? In short, we found the search and retrieval process as necessarily iterative and recursive as qualitative inquiry itself.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSearching and retrieving in qualitative researchen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarroso, Julieen_US
dc.author.detailsJulie Barroso, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: julie_barroso@unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165816-
dc.description.abstractThe explosion of information in the health sciences and the expanded availability of electronic citation databases now challenge researchers to find relevant information in an organized, efficient, focused, systematic, and thorough manner. Complicating search and retrieval for researchers interested in finding qualitative studies are issues related to qualitative research itself, which often crosses highly disparate disciplines, each of which employ their own language for identifying relevant literature. The databases containing the work of these varied disciplines have idiosyncratic features that searchers must know. Qualitative research encompasses highly disparate methodologies for which no uniform language exists. Moreover, the "experiences" that qualitative research emphasizes are themselves permeable and amorphous and, therefore, resistant to transformation into key terms. Searching for and retrieving qualitative studies thus requires retrofitting two apparently incompatible entities: the medium of the computer with the message of qualitative research. The comprehensive retrieval of relevant studies in a selected domain is especially vital to the integrity and validity of individual qualitative projects -- too many of which are still being conducted in the mistaken belief that no studies were previously conducted in the areas targeted in these projects -- and to projects directed toward systematically synthesizing the findings from these studies for use in practice. The purpose of this paper is to share the problems we faced while engaged in the search and retrieval process for qualitative studies on women with HIV/AIDS in a larger methodological study aimed at developing a protocol to conduct qualitative metasynthesis, and our solutions for these problems. We found that what we initially thought were clear boundaries for searching required our explicitly excluding certain phenomena and/or reconceptualizing what we meant by our search terms. For example, in the technical world of search and retrieval, AIDS is not only an infection, but also a category of assistive devices, as in hearing and speech aids. The use of the term "female" yielded a study on a transsexual person's experience of HIV/AIDS and thus forced us to reconsider what we meant by female experience; was it the experience of genetic females or persons living as females we were after? In short, we found the search and retrieval process as necessarily iterative and recursive as qualitative inquiry itself.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:34:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:34:17Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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