2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165819
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Correlates of symptom uncertainty
Author(s):
Christman, Norma
Author Details:
Norma Christman, University of Kentucky College of Nursing, Lexington, Kentucky, USA, email: njchri1@pop.uky.edu
Abstract:
Uncertainty that accompanies health-related experiences may profoundly influence adaptive responses. Much of what is presently known about illness uncertainty is based on a measure derived from cognitive models of information processing and stress and coping theory with statistically derived subscales. Studying uncertainty within the context of specific health-related experiences might lead to new understandings and more specifically targeted intervention strategies. The correlates of symptom uncertainty are examined using data from a study of 76 persons having radiation therapy (RT) for gynecologic, lung, or head/neck cancers. The majority were white (92%), female (68%), married (61%), either homemakers (32%) or employed outside the home (41%). Most had stage II or less disease (63%), were within 1 month of diagnosis (83%), and were being treated with curative intent. The symptom uncertainty scale contained 10 items either modified or drawn from the Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale. The internal consistency estimate was .67. A non-significant correlation (.15, p>.05) between a measure of body awareness and symptom uncertainty supports the scale's discriminant validity. Significant correlations between measures of predictability (-.47, p<.0001) and understanding (-.27, p<.05) support the concurrent validity of the scale. Potential correlates included self-report of symptom severity, number of symptoms, symptom recall from treatment consent; measures of optimism, mood states, and functional status (recreational, social and household activities and time away from home); and education. Symptom uncertainty was negatively related to optimism (-.23, p<.05) and unrelated to education and symptom recall. During treatment week 3 when side-effects from RT were beginning to occur, symptom uncertainty was positively related to anxiety (.65, p<.0001), depression (.55, p<.0001), and anger (.45, p<.0001), negatively related to social (-.35, p<.01) and household activities (-.24, p<.05), and to time away from home (-.31, p<.01). Symptom uncertainty also was positively related to self-reported symptom severity (.45, p<.0001) and number of symptoms (.39, p<.0001). Neither symptom severity nor number of symptoms was related to predictability or understanding, suggesting that symptom uncertainty captures more than perceptions of the severity and number of symptoms experienced. Interventions specifically designed to increase the clarity of symptom experiences associated with illness and health care may lessen the negative effects of symptom uncertainty.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCorrelates of symptom uncertaintyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChristman, Normaen_US
dc.author.detailsNorma Christman, University of Kentucky College of Nursing, Lexington, Kentucky, USA, email: njchri1@pop.uky.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165819-
dc.description.abstractUncertainty that accompanies health-related experiences may profoundly influence adaptive responses. Much of what is presently known about illness uncertainty is based on a measure derived from cognitive models of information processing and stress and coping theory with statistically derived subscales. Studying uncertainty within the context of specific health-related experiences might lead to new understandings and more specifically targeted intervention strategies. The correlates of symptom uncertainty are examined using data from a study of 76 persons having radiation therapy (RT) for gynecologic, lung, or head/neck cancers. The majority were white (92%), female (68%), married (61%), either homemakers (32%) or employed outside the home (41%). Most had stage II or less disease (63%), were within 1 month of diagnosis (83%), and were being treated with curative intent. The symptom uncertainty scale contained 10 items either modified or drawn from the Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale. The internal consistency estimate was .67. A non-significant correlation (.15, p>.05) between a measure of body awareness and symptom uncertainty supports the scale's discriminant validity. Significant correlations between measures of predictability (-.47, p<.0001) and understanding (-.27, p<.05) support the concurrent validity of the scale. Potential correlates included self-report of symptom severity, number of symptoms, symptom recall from treatment consent; measures of optimism, mood states, and functional status (recreational, social and household activities and time away from home); and education. Symptom uncertainty was negatively related to optimism (-.23, p<.05) and unrelated to education and symptom recall. During treatment week 3 when side-effects from RT were beginning to occur, symptom uncertainty was positively related to anxiety (.65, p<.0001), depression (.55, p<.0001), and anger (.45, p<.0001), negatively related to social (-.35, p<.01) and household activities (-.24, p<.05), and to time away from home (-.31, p<.01). Symptom uncertainty also was positively related to self-reported symptom severity (.45, p<.0001) and number of symptoms (.39, p<.0001). Neither symptom severity nor number of symptoms was related to predictability or understanding, suggesting that symptom uncertainty captures more than perceptions of the severity and number of symptoms experienced. Interventions specifically designed to increase the clarity of symptom experiences associated with illness and health care may lessen the negative effects of symptom uncertainty.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:34:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:34:22Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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