Predictors of length of stay, discharge disposition, and hospital charges in elders following hip or knee arthroplasty

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165822
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of length of stay, discharge disposition, and hospital charges in elders following hip or knee arthroplasty
Author(s):
Epps, Cynthia
Author Details:
Cynthia Epps, Assistant Professor, State University of West Georgia Department of Nursing, Carrollton, Georgia, USA, email: cepps@westga.edu
Abstract:
Osteoarthritis is a leading cause of disability in the United States, affecting 15.8 million older adults. If conservative treatment for osteoarthritis fails, surgical procedures such as total hip or total knee arthroplasty are considered. As healthcare expenditures have increased, Medicare has mandated shorter hospital lengths of stay for older people undergoing these procedures. An Acute Care Arthroplasty Model, based on Neuman's Systems Model, was developed for this retrospective study. The research questions were designed to identify differences in patient, clinical, and treatment factors in patients discharged home compared to those discharged to subacute facilities following hip and knee arthroplasty and to determine the relationship of these factors to length of stay, discharge disposition, and hospital charges. Data were collected from the medical records of 166 patients over the age of 60 who underwent total hip or knee arthroplasty between November 1, 1999 and July 15, 2001. Data analyses indicated that patients discharged from the hospital to another care facility were likely to be older women who lived alone. Married women were more likely than married men to be discharged to another healthcare facility as were those with more comorbidities and more postoperative complications. Gender and age increased length of stay and hospital charges, postoperative complications contributed to extended lengths of stay, and both time in surgery and postoperative complications contributed to higher hospital charges. Findings from this study can be used to design and test practice guidelines and clinical pathways for total hip and knee arthroplasty patients so that quality of care is enhanced and costs are contained.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of length of stay, discharge disposition, and hospital charges in elders following hip or knee arthroplastyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEpps, Cynthiaen_US
dc.author.detailsCynthia Epps, Assistant Professor, State University of West Georgia Department of Nursing, Carrollton, Georgia, USA, email: cepps@westga.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165822-
dc.description.abstractOsteoarthritis is a leading cause of disability in the United States, affecting 15.8 million older adults. If conservative treatment for osteoarthritis fails, surgical procedures such as total hip or total knee arthroplasty are considered. As healthcare expenditures have increased, Medicare has mandated shorter hospital lengths of stay for older people undergoing these procedures. An Acute Care Arthroplasty Model, based on Neuman's Systems Model, was developed for this retrospective study. The research questions were designed to identify differences in patient, clinical, and treatment factors in patients discharged home compared to those discharged to subacute facilities following hip and knee arthroplasty and to determine the relationship of these factors to length of stay, discharge disposition, and hospital charges. Data were collected from the medical records of 166 patients over the age of 60 who underwent total hip or knee arthroplasty between November 1, 1999 and July 15, 2001. Data analyses indicated that patients discharged from the hospital to another care facility were likely to be older women who lived alone. Married women were more likely than married men to be discharged to another healthcare facility as were those with more comorbidities and more postoperative complications. Gender and age increased length of stay and hospital charges, postoperative complications contributed to extended lengths of stay, and both time in surgery and postoperative complications contributed to higher hospital charges. Findings from this study can be used to design and test practice guidelines and clinical pathways for total hip and knee arthroplasty patients so that quality of care is enhanced and costs are contained.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:34:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:34:25Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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