2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165823
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Community nursing support for schizophrenic clients
Author(s):
Beebe, Lora
Author Details:
Lora Beebe, University of Florida College of Nursing, Gainesville, Florida, USA, email: lbeebe@nursing.ufl.edu
Abstract:
Purpose. A true experimental, post-test only, control group design was used to test the effectiveness of a telephone nursing intervention in increasing community survival, and decreasing the number and length of rehospitalizations for persons with schizophrenia. Theoretical Framework. The vulnerability model was used as a framework for the study. The vulnerability hypothesis states that stressors trigger symptoms of disease in vulnerable populations. The intervention was hypothesized to function as a moderating factor to reduce the effects of stress on vulnerable persons with schizophrenia. The nursing intervention was guided by Peplau's theory of Interpersonal Relations in Nursing. Sample. The sample consisted of 37 persons with schizophrenia residing in the community after discharge from a state psychiatric hospital. Subjects ranged in age from 18 to 68 years with a mean of 40 years. Females comprised 27% (n = 10) of the sample. Method. Experimental subjects received the telephone nursing intervention weekly for three months; control subjects received informational calls at weeks 6 and 12. Community survival, i.e. the number of days spent in the community prior to first rehospitalization during the study, as well as number and length of readmission episodes were monitored. Other variables included sociodemographic characteristics, number of lifetime psychiatric hospitalizations, symptoms leading to hospitalization, alternative care sought before hospitalization, and Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale Scores. Results. Readmission rates were 13% (n = 2) for experimental subjects and 23% (n = 5) for controls. Compared to controls, experimental subjects experienced a 4% increase in community survival and a 27% reduction in length of stay if readmission occurred. Conclusions. Although the small number of readmissions observed precluded demonstration of statistical significance, these preliminary data suggest that telephone intervention can increase community survival in persons with schizophrenia. Recommendations. Telephone intervention is an efficient and cost effective way to provide psychiatric nursing services. Future studies should focus on increasing sample size in order to demonstrate statistical effects with confidence. More research is needed to refine the intervention for application to subpopulations.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCommunity nursing support for schizophrenic clientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBeebe, Loraen_US
dc.author.detailsLora Beebe, University of Florida College of Nursing, Gainesville, Florida, USA, email: lbeebe@nursing.ufl.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165823-
dc.description.abstractPurpose. A true experimental, post-test only, control group design was used to test the effectiveness of a telephone nursing intervention in increasing community survival, and decreasing the number and length of rehospitalizations for persons with schizophrenia. Theoretical Framework. The vulnerability model was used as a framework for the study. The vulnerability hypothesis states that stressors trigger symptoms of disease in vulnerable populations. The intervention was hypothesized to function as a moderating factor to reduce the effects of stress on vulnerable persons with schizophrenia. The nursing intervention was guided by Peplau's theory of Interpersonal Relations in Nursing. Sample. The sample consisted of 37 persons with schizophrenia residing in the community after discharge from a state psychiatric hospital. Subjects ranged in age from 18 to 68 years with a mean of 40 years. Females comprised 27% (n = 10) of the sample. Method. Experimental subjects received the telephone nursing intervention weekly for three months; control subjects received informational calls at weeks 6 and 12. Community survival, i.e. the number of days spent in the community prior to first rehospitalization during the study, as well as number and length of readmission episodes were monitored. Other variables included sociodemographic characteristics, number of lifetime psychiatric hospitalizations, symptoms leading to hospitalization, alternative care sought before hospitalization, and Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale Scores. Results. Readmission rates were 13% (n = 2) for experimental subjects and 23% (n = 5) for controls. Compared to controls, experimental subjects experienced a 4% increase in community survival and a 27% reduction in length of stay if readmission occurred. Conclusions. Although the small number of readmissions observed precluded demonstration of statistical significance, these preliminary data suggest that telephone intervention can increase community survival in persons with schizophrenia. Recommendations. Telephone intervention is an efficient and cost effective way to provide psychiatric nursing services. Future studies should focus on increasing sample size in order to demonstrate statistical effects with confidence. More research is needed to refine the intervention for application to subpopulations.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:34:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:34:26Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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