2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165824
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Efficacy of a School Based Intervention Program for African American Adolescents
Author(s):
Covelli, Maureen
Author Details:
Maureen Covelli, PhD, RN, Associate Professor, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida, USA, email: maureen.covelli@ucf.edu
Abstract:
Research indicates that cardiovascular risk factors are present in adolescence. The purposes of this quasi-experimental design study were to determine the effects of a school based health promotion intervention and to explore the relationship of cardiovascular reactivity, as determined by blood pressure and salivary cortisol during physiologic stress, to family history of hypertension. Method: The subjects were forty-eight African American adolescents, ages of 14 to16 years old, attending an urban high school. Subjects were recruited from two comparable courses the Personal Fitness Course designated the intervention group (n = 31), and a Life Management Course, designated the control group (n=17). The intervention was a nine-week program that focused on knowledge, diet, exercise, and stress management. The independent variables were the intervention program, family history of hypertension, and physiologic stress. The Hines cold pressor test (one hand immersed in cold water for one minute) was used to induce physiologic stress. The dependent variables were blood pressure and salivary cortisol reactivity, knowledge, diet and exercise. Multivariate repeated measures analysis of variance and covariance and descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Conclusions: Statistical analysis revealed the efficacy of the intervention in relation to knowledge (p = 0.0001), exercise (p = 0.0001) and intake of fruits and vegetables (p = 0.0001). Statistical analysis did not support significant changes in systolic blood pressure (p = 0.5548), diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.9719), or salivary cortisol levels (p = 0.2469) between groups. There was a positive correlation between changes in blood pressure and family history of hypertension. There was a significant difference in cardiovascular reactivity in the group with family history of hypertension (p= 0.0338). The mean cortisol for both groups was elevated (18nmol/ml). Clinically significant were the findings that, fourteen adolescents were classified as hypertensive, cortisol levels were elevated, and ten subjects in the intervention program had reduced their overall blood pressure.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEfficacy of a School Based Intervention Program for African American Adolescentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCovelli, Maureenen_US
dc.author.detailsMaureen Covelli, PhD, RN, Associate Professor, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida, USA, email: maureen.covelli@ucf.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165824-
dc.description.abstractResearch indicates that cardiovascular risk factors are present in adolescence. The purposes of this quasi-experimental design study were to determine the effects of a school based health promotion intervention and to explore the relationship of cardiovascular reactivity, as determined by blood pressure and salivary cortisol during physiologic stress, to family history of hypertension. Method: The subjects were forty-eight African American adolescents, ages of 14 to16 years old, attending an urban high school. Subjects were recruited from two comparable courses the Personal Fitness Course designated the intervention group (n = 31), and a Life Management Course, designated the control group (n=17). The intervention was a nine-week program that focused on knowledge, diet, exercise, and stress management. The independent variables were the intervention program, family history of hypertension, and physiologic stress. The Hines cold pressor test (one hand immersed in cold water for one minute) was used to induce physiologic stress. The dependent variables were blood pressure and salivary cortisol reactivity, knowledge, diet and exercise. Multivariate repeated measures analysis of variance and covariance and descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Conclusions: Statistical analysis revealed the efficacy of the intervention in relation to knowledge (p = 0.0001), exercise (p = 0.0001) and intake of fruits and vegetables (p = 0.0001). Statistical analysis did not support significant changes in systolic blood pressure (p = 0.5548), diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.9719), or salivary cortisol levels (p = 0.2469) between groups. There was a positive correlation between changes in blood pressure and family history of hypertension. There was a significant difference in cardiovascular reactivity in the group with family history of hypertension (p= 0.0338). The mean cortisol for both groups was elevated (18nmol/ml). Clinically significant were the findings that, fourteen adolescents were classified as hypertensive, cortisol levels were elevated, and ten subjects in the intervention program had reduced their overall blood pressure.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:34:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:34:28Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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