Effects of depression, helplessness, negative affect, and stress on pain and sleep over the menstrual cycle in rheumatoid arthritis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165825
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of depression, helplessness, negative affect, and stress on pain and sleep over the menstrual cycle in rheumatoid arthritis
Author(s):
Bourguignon, Cheryl
Author Details:
Cheryl Bourguignon, University of Virginia School of Nursing, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: bourguignon@virginia.edu
Abstract:
Aim of Investigation: To investigate the effects of mood states (depression, helplessness, negative affect, and stress) on pain and sleep over menstrual cycle phases (follicular and luteal) in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Conceptual Model: The Symptom Management Model (developed by nursing faculty at UCSF) was the conceptual basis of this study. Sample: The pilot study consisted of 11 women with RA, ranging in age from 21-45 years (mean = 34 ( 9). Methods: Serum progesterone levels verified menstrual cycle phase. Pain ratings were averaged over 3 nights of each phase. Sleep efficiency was measured objectively using wrist actigraphy for 48 hours in both phases. Mood states were each measured once. Results: In this pilot study, we explored trends as well as statistically significant results. Pain overall tended to be greater in the luteal phase (p=.06) compared to the follicular. Women with RA who had higher depression (.02), or negative affect (.07), or perceived stress (.07) reported more pain while helplessness did not significantly affect pain. There were no significant interactions between mood states and phases of the menstrual cycle for pain. Sleep efficiency overall was lower in the luteal phase (.04) than the follicular. There were significant interactions between mood states and phases of the menstrual cycle for sleep efficiency. While mood states did not affect sleep efficiency in the follicular phase, in the luteal phase those women with higher levels of depression (.03), or negative affect (.05), or perceived stress (.05), or helplessness (.06) had lower sleep efficiencies. Conclusions: Women with RA tended to have more pain and lower sleep efficiency in the luteal phase than the follicular. Mood states affected pain overall, regardless of menstrual cycle phase. Those with more negative mood states reported greater pain. Mood states did affect sleep efficiency differently over the phases of the menstrual cycle. In the follicular phase when estrogen and progesterone levels were low, sleep efficiencies did not differ depending upon mood states. However in the luteal phase when estrogen and progesterone levels are high, those women with more negative mood states had lower sleep efficiencies.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of depression, helplessness, negative affect, and stress on pain and sleep over the menstrual cycle in rheumatoid arthritisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBourguignon, Cherylen_US
dc.author.detailsCheryl Bourguignon, University of Virginia School of Nursing, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: bourguignon@virginia.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165825-
dc.description.abstractAim of Investigation: To investigate the effects of mood states (depression, helplessness, negative affect, and stress) on pain and sleep over menstrual cycle phases (follicular and luteal) in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Conceptual Model: The Symptom Management Model (developed by nursing faculty at UCSF) was the conceptual basis of this study. Sample: The pilot study consisted of 11 women with RA, ranging in age from 21-45 years (mean = 34 ( 9). Methods: Serum progesterone levels verified menstrual cycle phase. Pain ratings were averaged over 3 nights of each phase. Sleep efficiency was measured objectively using wrist actigraphy for 48 hours in both phases. Mood states were each measured once. Results: In this pilot study, we explored trends as well as statistically significant results. Pain overall tended to be greater in the luteal phase (p=.06) compared to the follicular. Women with RA who had higher depression (.02), or negative affect (.07), or perceived stress (.07) reported more pain while helplessness did not significantly affect pain. There were no significant interactions between mood states and phases of the menstrual cycle for pain. Sleep efficiency overall was lower in the luteal phase (.04) than the follicular. There were significant interactions between mood states and phases of the menstrual cycle for sleep efficiency. While mood states did not affect sleep efficiency in the follicular phase, in the luteal phase those women with higher levels of depression (.03), or negative affect (.05), or perceived stress (.05), or helplessness (.06) had lower sleep efficiencies. Conclusions: Women with RA tended to have more pain and lower sleep efficiency in the luteal phase than the follicular. Mood states affected pain overall, regardless of menstrual cycle phase. Those with more negative mood states reported greater pain. Mood states did affect sleep efficiency differently over the phases of the menstrual cycle. In the follicular phase when estrogen and progesterone levels were low, sleep efficiencies did not differ depending upon mood states. However in the luteal phase when estrogen and progesterone levels are high, those women with more negative mood states had lower sleep efficiencies.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:34:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:34:29Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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