Characterization and changes in the hot flash symptom complex over time in breast cancer survivors with comparison to age-matched healthy women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165826
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Characterization and changes in the hot flash symptom complex over time in breast cancer survivors with comparison to age-matched healthy women
Author(s):
Carpenter, Janet
Author Details:
Janet Carpenter, PhD, Assistant Professor, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: janet.s.carpenter@vanderbilt.edu
Abstract:
Background: Despite increasing attention to hot flashes following treatment for breast cancer, few studies have evaluated hot flashes in conjunction with other physical, psychological, and behavioral outcomes. Hot flashes, like other cancer treatment related symptoms, are unlikely to occur in isolation and more likely to occur in conjunction with other symptoms as a symptom complex. Objectives: The purposes of this study were to characterize and compare the hot flash symptom complex between breast cancer survivors and age-matched healthy women without cancer. Method: Participants were surveyed at an initial time point and again six months later using questionnaires and a 2-day prospective hot flash diary methodology. Comparison women were matched within two years on age and were naturally pre-, peri-, or postmenopausal. Results: At both time points, in comparison to HW, BCS reported hot flashes that were significantly more frequent, severe, bothersome and of greater duration (p's < .05). At time 1 in comparison to HW and to BCS with none to mild hot flashes, BCS with moderate to severe hot flashes reported more frequent and distressing menopausal symptoms (p's < .001), higher POMS-SF tension, fatigue, depression, confusion and total mood disturbance (p's < .01), higher negative affect (p < .01), more interference with daily activities, including mood, concentration, and sexuality (p's < .01), and greater interference with overall quality of life (p < .01). These findings were replicated at time 2. Conclusions: Findings suggest hot flashes following breast cancer appear within a symptom complex characterized by more frequent and distressing menopausal symptoms, higher negative mood, more negative affect, greater interference with daily activities including mood, sleep, concentration, and sexuality, and greater interference with overall quality of life. Findings also support the uniqueness of the problem of hot flashes in breast cancer survivors. Results suggest that future intervention research in this population include additional physical, psychological, and behavioral outcomes identified here as part of the hot flash symptom complex.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCharacterization and changes in the hot flash symptom complex over time in breast cancer survivors with comparison to age-matched healthy womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarpenter, Janeten_US
dc.author.detailsJanet Carpenter, PhD, Assistant Professor, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: janet.s.carpenter@vanderbilt.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165826-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Despite increasing attention to hot flashes following treatment for breast cancer, few studies have evaluated hot flashes in conjunction with other physical, psychological, and behavioral outcomes. Hot flashes, like other cancer treatment related symptoms, are unlikely to occur in isolation and more likely to occur in conjunction with other symptoms as a symptom complex. Objectives: The purposes of this study were to characterize and compare the hot flash symptom complex between breast cancer survivors and age-matched healthy women without cancer. Method: Participants were surveyed at an initial time point and again six months later using questionnaires and a 2-day prospective hot flash diary methodology. Comparison women were matched within two years on age and were naturally pre-, peri-, or postmenopausal. Results: At both time points, in comparison to HW, BCS reported hot flashes that were significantly more frequent, severe, bothersome and of greater duration (p's < .05). At time 1 in comparison to HW and to BCS with none to mild hot flashes, BCS with moderate to severe hot flashes reported more frequent and distressing menopausal symptoms (p's < .001), higher POMS-SF tension, fatigue, depression, confusion and total mood disturbance (p's < .01), higher negative affect (p < .01), more interference with daily activities, including mood, concentration, and sexuality (p's < .01), and greater interference with overall quality of life (p < .01). These findings were replicated at time 2. Conclusions: Findings suggest hot flashes following breast cancer appear within a symptom complex characterized by more frequent and distressing menopausal symptoms, higher negative mood, more negative affect, greater interference with daily activities including mood, sleep, concentration, and sexuality, and greater interference with overall quality of life. Findings also support the uniqueness of the problem of hot flashes in breast cancer survivors. Results suggest that future intervention research in this population include additional physical, psychological, and behavioral outcomes identified here as part of the hot flash symptom complex.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:34:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:34:30Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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