2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165827
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A test of telephone-based caregiver skill training
Author(s):
Davis, Linda
Author Details:
Linda Davis, Professor, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing, Birmingham, Alabama, USA, email: davisl@uab.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Investigators have proposed that telephone contacts are an effective method for delivering therapeutic interventions ranging from health education and symptom management to psychotherapy. The purpose of this study was to compare telephone training with in-home training for reducing caregivers' burden, distress and depressive symptoms as well as improving caregivers' perceived abilities to manage the functional dependencies and behavioral problems of the persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD) for whom they are caring. Method: A total of 71 caregiving dyads were randomized into telephone training, home training, or friendly call (comparison) group. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare change scores after 12 weeks of training and 12 weeks without contacts. Results: There were treatment differences on caregiving burden at Time 2, with the home training group and the friendly call group demonstrating greater burden reduction [F (2,41) = 10.75, p=.001]. At T3 (24 weeks after baseline), caregivers in home training had maintained a treatment advantage in burden reduction over both telephone training and friendly call groups [F (2,41) = 4.65, p=.02]. An additional treatment effect at Time 3 was in reduced distress [F (2,40) = 4.39, p=.02), with the home training group having significantly less distress than the friendly call group (p=.005) but not significantly less than the telephone training group (p=.178). Conclusions: While all three types of contact reduced caregiver burden over time, in-home training had more immediate and lasting effects. Telephone training reduced caregiver distress but the benefits of this training method took longer to achieve. Friendly (social support) phone contacts provided only temporary benefits to caregivers.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA test of telephone-based caregiver skill trainingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Lindaen_US
dc.author.detailsLinda Davis, Professor, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing, Birmingham, Alabama, USA, email: davisl@uab.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165827-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Investigators have proposed that telephone contacts are an effective method for delivering therapeutic interventions ranging from health education and symptom management to psychotherapy. The purpose of this study was to compare telephone training with in-home training for reducing caregivers' burden, distress and depressive symptoms as well as improving caregivers' perceived abilities to manage the functional dependencies and behavioral problems of the persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD) for whom they are caring. Method: A total of 71 caregiving dyads were randomized into telephone training, home training, or friendly call (comparison) group. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare change scores after 12 weeks of training and 12 weeks without contacts. Results: There were treatment differences on caregiving burden at Time 2, with the home training group and the friendly call group demonstrating greater burden reduction [F (2,41) = 10.75, p=.001]. At T3 (24 weeks after baseline), caregivers in home training had maintained a treatment advantage in burden reduction over both telephone training and friendly call groups [F (2,41) = 4.65, p=.02]. An additional treatment effect at Time 3 was in reduced distress [F (2,40) = 4.39, p=.02), with the home training group having significantly less distress than the friendly call group (p=.005) but not significantly less than the telephone training group (p=.178). Conclusions: While all three types of contact reduced caregiver burden over time, in-home training had more immediate and lasting effects. Telephone training reduced caregiver distress but the benefits of this training method took longer to achieve. Friendly (social support) phone contacts provided only temporary benefits to caregivers.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:34:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:34:31Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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