Participatory action research: Tailoring health disparity reducing interventions for minority populations

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165829
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Participatory action research: Tailoring health disparity reducing interventions for minority populations
Author(s):
Goeppinger, Jean
Author Details:
Jean Goeppinger, Professor, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: jean_goeppinger@unc.edu
Abstract:
Chronic disease is characterized by a prolonged course, the absence of cures, continuing needs for professional care, and unending demands for self-management. 88% of persons 65 and older have at least one chronic disease; 69% of them have more than one. Caring for the chronically ill accounts for approximately 70% of the nation's health care costs. Chronic disease disproportionately affects minorities. One behavioral intervention, the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) developed by Lorig at Stanford University, has been found effective in improving self-care behaviors and disease symptoms and in decreasing health care utilization. These findings have, however, limited generalizability as the majority of study subjects have been European American. The purpose of this study was to tailor the CDSMP in ways that increased its cultural acceptability to African Americans. We used a participatory action research (PAR) method and partnered with respected leaders of African-American communities, my co-authors. Our study was conducted in three phases. During Phase One we evaluated the cultural acceptability of the CDSMP. We conducted three focus groups with African-American adults. Focus group members were invited by community partners. Forty-six men and women with heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and arthritis participated. The focus groups were co-led by the community partners and myself and held in churches and a community center. Discussions were lively and lasted approximately one and a half hours. They were audiotaped. My community partners and I collaborated in the content analysis of discussion transcripts and summaries. We identified five themes that necessitated modifications of the CDSMP: 1) cultural barriers to healthy eating, 2) the need to decrease dietary fat and salt; 3) barriers to effective cross-cultural communication with healthcare providers; 4) the importance of faith and spirituality; and 5) the need for a third CDSMP workshop leader known and respected by the community. These themes were included in revisions of the CDSMP (Phase Two). During Phase Three we piloted the adapted CDSMP in two communities. The workshops were co-led by African Americans and myself and were located in a church and local health department. Eighteen adults and elders participated. Many had been members of Phase One focus groups. At the conclusion of each workshop, we asked participants to evaluate the adapted CDSMP. The conversations were audiotaped and transcribed. Transcriptions and summaries were sent to all community partners and once again, we collaborated in content analysis. Our findings validated those in Phase One and included additional suggestions for incorporating spirituality into the CDSMP. We are now planning the full implementation of the revised CDSMP in African-American communities.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParticipatory action research: Tailoring health disparity reducing interventions for minority populationsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGoeppinger, Jeanen_US
dc.author.detailsJean Goeppinger, Professor, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: jean_goeppinger@unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165829-
dc.description.abstractChronic disease is characterized by a prolonged course, the absence of cures, continuing needs for professional care, and unending demands for self-management. 88% of persons 65 and older have at least one chronic disease; 69% of them have more than one. Caring for the chronically ill accounts for approximately 70% of the nation's health care costs. Chronic disease disproportionately affects minorities. One behavioral intervention, the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) developed by Lorig at Stanford University, has been found effective in improving self-care behaviors and disease symptoms and in decreasing health care utilization. These findings have, however, limited generalizability as the majority of study subjects have been European American. The purpose of this study was to tailor the CDSMP in ways that increased its cultural acceptability to African Americans. We used a participatory action research (PAR) method and partnered with respected leaders of African-American communities, my co-authors. Our study was conducted in three phases. During Phase One we evaluated the cultural acceptability of the CDSMP. We conducted three focus groups with African-American adults. Focus group members were invited by community partners. Forty-six men and women with heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and arthritis participated. The focus groups were co-led by the community partners and myself and held in churches and a community center. Discussions were lively and lasted approximately one and a half hours. They were audiotaped. My community partners and I collaborated in the content analysis of discussion transcripts and summaries. We identified five themes that necessitated modifications of the CDSMP: 1) cultural barriers to healthy eating, 2) the need to decrease dietary fat and salt; 3) barriers to effective cross-cultural communication with healthcare providers; 4) the importance of faith and spirituality; and 5) the need for a third CDSMP workshop leader known and respected by the community. These themes were included in revisions of the CDSMP (Phase Two). During Phase Three we piloted the adapted CDSMP in two communities. The workshops were co-led by African Americans and myself and were located in a church and local health department. Eighteen adults and elders participated. Many had been members of Phase One focus groups. At the conclusion of each workshop, we asked participants to evaluate the adapted CDSMP. The conversations were audiotaped and transcribed. Transcriptions and summaries were sent to all community partners and once again, we collaborated in content analysis. Our findings validated those in Phase One and included additional suggestions for incorporating spirituality into the CDSMP. We are now planning the full implementation of the revised CDSMP in African-American communities.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:34:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:34:34Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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