2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165830
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A qualitative study of intervening as a passenger in a drinking-driving situation
Author(s):
Smith, Mary
Author Details:
Mary Smith, PhD, Associate Dean, West Virginia University School of Nursing, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA, email: msmith@hsc.wvu.edu
Abstract:
Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe elements in the structure of intervening in drinking-driving behavior by passengers. Passengers offer potential for breaking the link between drinking and driving. In a national study of 10,277 drunken fatalities, 5-10% of the cases involved sober passengers who could have intervened. Half of the fatalities were persons 16-19 years of age and a third of those age 20-24 had at least one sober passenger. Design: A descriptive qualitative design using phenomenological analysis guided the study. Population: Fifteen senior nursing students between the ages of 19-21 years were recruited through announcements in classes. It was assumed that nursing students understand the meaning of intervening and could offer a rich, complete, and thorough description. Concept: The major concept was the lived experience of intervening as a passenger when the driver is drunk. Method: Participants were seated in a quiet area and invited to respond to the following statement in writing. "Think of a recent situation when you intervened to stop someone who was drinking from driving. Write as though you were telling the story of intervening to another person. Start at the beginning, by describing the situation, then go into how you intervened event by event and lastly tell how it all ended. Don't worry about grammar or spelling just describe your story of intervening in as much detail as is possible." Findings: Intervening as a passenger in a drinking driving situation begins as a harmonious going out with friends and/or family where there is a tacit or explicit agreement about drinking and driving. A shift in the social situation occurs as the driver has more to drink and becomes drunk. When it is time to leave the intervener tries to reason with the driver to convince the person that he/she should not drive. A confrontation develops as the intervener gives increasingly forceful claims for not driving, and the drinker disputes the reasons in a contentious manner. All at once, the intervener imposes a creative twist in the course of events that eases the situation and the drinker acquiesces to not driving. Conclusions: Intervening as a passenger involves: 1) a tacit/explicit agreement about drinking and driving, 2) an escalating struggle about who will drive, and 3) a creative twist that enables the drinker to submit to not driving. Implications: Two major implications are proposed. First, that there be further verification of the three major findings through elaborated descriptions by passengers who have intervened and secondly, that a teaching strategy on intervening as a passenger be developed based on confirmation of the findings.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA qualitative study of intervening as a passenger in a drinking-driving situationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Smith, PhD, Associate Dean, West Virginia University School of Nursing, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA, email: msmith@hsc.wvu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165830-
dc.description.abstractObjective: The purpose of this study was to describe elements in the structure of intervening in drinking-driving behavior by passengers. Passengers offer potential for breaking the link between drinking and driving. In a national study of 10,277 drunken fatalities, 5-10% of the cases involved sober passengers who could have intervened. Half of the fatalities were persons 16-19 years of age and a third of those age 20-24 had at least one sober passenger. Design: A descriptive qualitative design using phenomenological analysis guided the study. Population: Fifteen senior nursing students between the ages of 19-21 years were recruited through announcements in classes. It was assumed that nursing students understand the meaning of intervening and could offer a rich, complete, and thorough description. Concept: The major concept was the lived experience of intervening as a passenger when the driver is drunk. Method: Participants were seated in a quiet area and invited to respond to the following statement in writing. "Think of a recent situation when you intervened to stop someone who was drinking from driving. Write as though you were telling the story of intervening to another person. Start at the beginning, by describing the situation, then go into how you intervened event by event and lastly tell how it all ended. Don't worry about grammar or spelling just describe your story of intervening in as much detail as is possible." Findings: Intervening as a passenger in a drinking driving situation begins as a harmonious going out with friends and/or family where there is a tacit or explicit agreement about drinking and driving. A shift in the social situation occurs as the driver has more to drink and becomes drunk. When it is time to leave the intervener tries to reason with the driver to convince the person that he/she should not drive. A confrontation develops as the intervener gives increasingly forceful claims for not driving, and the drinker disputes the reasons in a contentious manner. All at once, the intervener imposes a creative twist in the course of events that eases the situation and the drinker acquiesces to not driving. Conclusions: Intervening as a passenger involves: 1) a tacit/explicit agreement about drinking and driving, 2) an escalating struggle about who will drive, and 3) a creative twist that enables the drinker to submit to not driving. Implications: Two major implications are proposed. First, that there be further verification of the three major findings through elaborated descriptions by passengers who have intervened and secondly, that a teaching strategy on intervening as a passenger be developed based on confirmation of the findings.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:34:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:34:35Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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