2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165831
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
"On the Front Line:" Practicing Nurses Speak Out in Focus Groups
Author(s):
Shattell, Mona
Author Details:
Mona Shattell, Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Development, Professor, DePaul University, Chicago, Illinois, USA, email: mshattel@depaul.edu (updated February 2015)
Abstract:
Objective: Nurses are experiencing overwhelming challenges and growing frustrations in the practice arena. Staffing issues and other factors are causing many nurses to leave their positions and some to even leave the profession. The purpose of this study was to discover the barriers and facilitators to the retention of nurses. Method and procedure: The study was conducted using focus groups. Sample: Data were collected from a convenience sample of Registered Nurses (RNs) recruited from the registrants of a state nurses association convention. A total of 43 nurses participated in five different focus groups conducted at various times throughout the three-day convention. Phenomenon of interest: The phenomenon of interest was the retention of practicing nurses. Findings: Nurses in the practice setting experienced tremendous workload demands. In addition, they perceived a lack of support from peers and administrators related to negative attitudes and inadequate staffing. Their greatest concern for nursing as a profession was patient safety and quality of care. Their second most prevalent concern was their lack of control and power over their own practice. Aspects of a nursing position that made participants want to remain in their current positions were benefits/salary, respect, and satisfaction. Conclusions: The findings document that major stressors facing practicing nurses relate to inadequate staffing, but others relate to the lack of supportive attitudes and behaviors of colleagues and administrators in the workplace. Implications: Administrators must deal creatively and effectively with staffing issues, nurses should be given more power and control over their own practices, and all must work to improve the image of nursing if we are to resolve these critical nursing workforce issues. Additional studies are needed to identify strategies to improve the retention of nurses.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.title"On the Front Line:" Practicing Nurses Speak Out in Focus Groupsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorShattell, Monaen_US
dc.author.detailsMona Shattell, Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Development, Professor, DePaul University, Chicago, Illinois, USA, email: mshattel@depaul.edu (updated February 2015)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165831-
dc.description.abstractObjective: Nurses are experiencing overwhelming challenges and growing frustrations in the practice arena. Staffing issues and other factors are causing many nurses to leave their positions and some to even leave the profession. The purpose of this study was to discover the barriers and facilitators to the retention of nurses. Method and procedure: The study was conducted using focus groups. Sample: Data were collected from a convenience sample of Registered Nurses (RNs) recruited from the registrants of a state nurses association convention. A total of 43 nurses participated in five different focus groups conducted at various times throughout the three-day convention. Phenomenon of interest: The phenomenon of interest was the retention of practicing nurses. Findings: Nurses in the practice setting experienced tremendous workload demands. In addition, they perceived a lack of support from peers and administrators related to negative attitudes and inadequate staffing. Their greatest concern for nursing as a profession was patient safety and quality of care. Their second most prevalent concern was their lack of control and power over their own practice. Aspects of a nursing position that made participants want to remain in their current positions were benefits/salary, respect, and satisfaction. Conclusions: The findings document that major stressors facing practicing nurses relate to inadequate staffing, but others relate to the lack of supportive attitudes and behaviors of colleagues and administrators in the workplace. Implications: Administrators must deal creatively and effectively with staffing issues, nurses should be given more power and control over their own practices, and all must work to improve the image of nursing if we are to resolve these critical nursing workforce issues. Additional studies are needed to identify strategies to improve the retention of nurses.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:34:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:34:36Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.