A decade of nurse anesthesia scholarship within a collaborative campus-community partnership

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165832
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A decade of nurse anesthesia scholarship within a collaborative campus-community partnership
Author(s):
Tesh, Anita
Author Details:
Anita Tesh, University of North Carolina-Greensboro School of Nursing, Greensboro, North Carolina, USA, email: Anita_Tesh@uncg.edu
Abstract:
The challenges in nurse anesthesia education mirror the challenges seen in other areas of health education. Technology is expanding, care is increasingly complex, and the socio-political context of practice is complicated and ever changing. Helping students gain the essential basic knowledge and skills while preparing them to pursue lifelong evidence-based practice requires a collaborate effort between educators, practitioners, and researchers. Our community-campus collaborative partnership supports a graduate program allowing students to earn an MSN degree in conjunction with their education in nurse anesthesia. Students work with role models who are exemplars in practice, and with academic teachers and researchers. All groups collaborate in planning, implementing, and evaluating the curriculum. The purpose of this study was to describe the scope of our nurse anesthesia students advanced projects and theses from a decade of the community-campus collaboration, and to document how they have contributed to scholarship in the profession. This exhaustive descriptive study provided for classification of the content, methodology and outcome of the students required projects. A total of 194 student projects were evaluated. The content analysis categories followed the content outline for the national certification examination and provided a framework for identifying the impact of graduate student scholarship on nurse anesthesia practice. Student projects have contributed to knowledge in a number of areas, including anesthesia for specific clinical conditions (35%), comparison or evaluation of anesthetic agents (32%), evaluation of anesthetic equipment and techniques (22%), and critical areas. Methods used in the projects include experiments and quasi-experiments (21%), case studies (19%), position papers, comprehensive reviews of literature, and theoretical articles (46%), as well as teaching projects, and resource compilations. Outcomes of the projects include publication in flagship journals, presentations at national meetings and documented changes in practice. The campus-community collaboration has provided students with opportunities to make genuine contributions to knowledge and practice in their field, while socializing them to lifelong pursuit of both competence in practice and scholarly inquiry. This study has provides us with a framework for analyzing the impact of student scholarship on the profession, helped us target areas for improvement (e.g. increasing publication rates), and assisted us to guide students in selection of topics and methods for their projects. This project could serve as a model for other schools wishing to evaluate their programs or consider the advantages of campus-community partnerships.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA decade of nurse anesthesia scholarship within a collaborative campus-community partnershipen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTesh, Anitaen_US
dc.author.detailsAnita Tesh, University of North Carolina-Greensboro School of Nursing, Greensboro, North Carolina, USA, email: Anita_Tesh@uncg.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165832-
dc.description.abstractThe challenges in nurse anesthesia education mirror the challenges seen in other areas of health education. Technology is expanding, care is increasingly complex, and the socio-political context of practice is complicated and ever changing. Helping students gain the essential basic knowledge and skills while preparing them to pursue lifelong evidence-based practice requires a collaborate effort between educators, practitioners, and researchers. Our community-campus collaborative partnership supports a graduate program allowing students to earn an MSN degree in conjunction with their education in nurse anesthesia. Students work with role models who are exemplars in practice, and with academic teachers and researchers. All groups collaborate in planning, implementing, and evaluating the curriculum. The purpose of this study was to describe the scope of our nurse anesthesia students advanced projects and theses from a decade of the community-campus collaboration, and to document how they have contributed to scholarship in the profession. This exhaustive descriptive study provided for classification of the content, methodology and outcome of the students required projects. A total of 194 student projects were evaluated. The content analysis categories followed the content outline for the national certification examination and provided a framework for identifying the impact of graduate student scholarship on nurse anesthesia practice. Student projects have contributed to knowledge in a number of areas, including anesthesia for specific clinical conditions (35%), comparison or evaluation of anesthetic agents (32%), evaluation of anesthetic equipment and techniques (22%), and critical areas. Methods used in the projects include experiments and quasi-experiments (21%), case studies (19%), position papers, comprehensive reviews of literature, and theoretical articles (46%), as well as teaching projects, and resource compilations. Outcomes of the projects include publication in flagship journals, presentations at national meetings and documented changes in practice. The campus-community collaboration has provided students with opportunities to make genuine contributions to knowledge and practice in their field, while socializing them to lifelong pursuit of both competence in practice and scholarly inquiry. This study has provides us with a framework for analyzing the impact of student scholarship on the profession, helped us target areas for improvement (e.g. increasing publication rates), and assisted us to guide students in selection of topics and methods for their projects. This project could serve as a model for other schools wishing to evaluate their programs or consider the advantages of campus-community partnerships.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:34:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:34:38Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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