2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165833
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of the need for osteoporosis screening in a low risk population
Author(s):
Tesh, Anita
Author Details:
Anita Tesh, University of North Carolina-Greensboro School of Nursing, Greensboro, North Carolina, USA, email: Anita_Tesh@uncg.edu
Abstract:
Osteoporosis affects approximately 8 million Americans, mostly women. Another 17 million are said to be at risk for developing osteoporosis because of low bone mass (osteopenia). With the increased life span seen in this millennium, osteoporosis has become a very important health problem with both social and economic impacts on society. The annual cost of managing osteoporosis in the United States is estimated at $14 billion. However, only a fraction of women are screened for bone mineral density (BMD). Further, guidelines for the primary care provider on whom to screen are vague and contradictory. Routine screening is rarely done on premenopausal women. The purpose of this descriptive study was to answer two research questions: (1) what is the incidence of osteoporosis/osteopenia in employed women having routine BMD screenings? and (2) what is the incidence of osteoporosis/osteopenia among employed women identified as being at "low risk" for osteoporosis? This study took place in a workplace Nurse-Practitioner-run BMD screening clinic in a textile plant. The sample included 132 women of employable age. All women were evaluated with the Merck risk assessment questionnaire and screened with Peripheral Instantaneous X-ray Imager (PIXI). Abnormal PIXI scans were confirmed by full body dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The PIXI, a convenient and inexpensive screening device, was found to have a positive predictive value of 90%. Osteoporosis/osteopenia was found in 13% of the low risk (premenopausal, no history of fractures) group (n = 71). These women would not have been routinely screened under current clinical guidelines. Small body frames and positive family histories were predictive of osteoporosis/osteopenia in these low-risk women. Use of additional risk factors, such a smoking, did not improve prediction in the low risk women. Osteoporosis/osteopenia was also found in 26% of the postmenopausal women (n = 61). These postmenopausal women also had other risk factors, and would most likely have been diagnosed in routine screening under current clinical guidelines. The results of this study support the need for BMD screening for premenopausal women with small frames and positive family histories. Results also support the effectiveness of nurse-practitioner run workplace screening programs.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of the need for osteoporosis screening in a low risk populationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTesh, Anitaen_US
dc.author.detailsAnita Tesh, University of North Carolina-Greensboro School of Nursing, Greensboro, North Carolina, USA, email: Anita_Tesh@uncg.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165833-
dc.description.abstractOsteoporosis affects approximately 8 million Americans, mostly women. Another 17 million are said to be at risk for developing osteoporosis because of low bone mass (osteopenia). With the increased life span seen in this millennium, osteoporosis has become a very important health problem with both social and economic impacts on society. The annual cost of managing osteoporosis in the United States is estimated at $14 billion. However, only a fraction of women are screened for bone mineral density (BMD). Further, guidelines for the primary care provider on whom to screen are vague and contradictory. Routine screening is rarely done on premenopausal women. The purpose of this descriptive study was to answer two research questions: (1) what is the incidence of osteoporosis/osteopenia in employed women having routine BMD screenings? and (2) what is the incidence of osteoporosis/osteopenia among employed women identified as being at "low risk" for osteoporosis? This study took place in a workplace Nurse-Practitioner-run BMD screening clinic in a textile plant. The sample included 132 women of employable age. All women were evaluated with the Merck risk assessment questionnaire and screened with Peripheral Instantaneous X-ray Imager (PIXI). Abnormal PIXI scans were confirmed by full body dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The PIXI, a convenient and inexpensive screening device, was found to have a positive predictive value of 90%. Osteoporosis/osteopenia was found in 13% of the low risk (premenopausal, no history of fractures) group (n = 71). These women would not have been routinely screened under current clinical guidelines. Small body frames and positive family histories were predictive of osteoporosis/osteopenia in these low-risk women. Use of additional risk factors, such a smoking, did not improve prediction in the low risk women. Osteoporosis/osteopenia was also found in 26% of the postmenopausal women (n = 61). These postmenopausal women also had other risk factors, and would most likely have been diagnosed in routine screening under current clinical guidelines. The results of this study support the need for BMD screening for premenopausal women with small frames and positive family histories. Results also support the effectiveness of nurse-practitioner run workplace screening programs.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:34:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:34:39Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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