Efficacy of the living with uncertainty intervention in men electing watchful waiting for localized prostate cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165835
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Efficacy of the living with uncertainty intervention in men electing watchful waiting for localized prostate cancer
Author(s):
Bailey, Jr., Donald
Author Details:
Donald Bailey, Jr., MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, (update February 2015) email: chip.bailey@duke.edu
Abstract:
This paper will report the results from a theoretically derived nursing intervention delivered to older men electing watchful waiting as their treatment option for localized prostate. The intervention was designed to help these older men incorporate uncertainty into their lives. The sample consists of 41 men who were randomly assigned to either the experimental or control arms of the study. Men in the experimental groups received 5 weekly phone calls from a male nurse. In the control condition, the subject's received naturally occurring care. Watchful waiting is a protocol in which older men with localized prostate cancer (usually men in their 70s) or younger men with chronic illnesses are not offered surgical or radiation treatment but instead are watched on a set schedule. Older men who have elected watchful waiting as their treatment option live every day with the knowledge that they have cancer. Living with untreated prostate cancer induces stress in older men electing watchful waiting because they are uncertain about how long the cancer has been growing and about when and how symptoms may appear. Without markers to indicate disease symptomatology, men may incorrectly attribute physical changes associated with aging to disease progression (Bailey & Mishel, 1999). The sample was 86% Caucasian and 14% African American with an average age of 75.4 years. Their time since diagnosis ranged from 1 month to 124 months. The data to be reported in this presentation is the change over time from baseline (T1) to 2.5 months post-baseline (T2). Repeated measures analyses of variance (ANOVA) were used to test the efficacy of the Living with Uncertainty Intervention (LUI). Men receiving the intervention came to view their lives in a new light (p= .02) when compared with controls using a subscale of the Growth Through Uncertainty Scale. Intervention subjects experienced a decrease in their levels of confusion (p= .04) and depression (p=.06), two mood states measured by the Profile of Mood States over controls from TI to T2. Additionally, intervention subjects reported an improvement in their quality of life over controls (p= .006) and believed their quality of life in the future (six months) would be better than controls (p=.01). The clinical utility of these findings will be discussed in the paper.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEfficacy of the living with uncertainty intervention in men electing watchful waiting for localized prostate canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorBailey, Jr., Donalden_US
dc.author.detailsDonald Bailey, Jr., MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, (update February 2015) email: chip.bailey@duke.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165835-
dc.description.abstractThis paper will report the results from a theoretically derived nursing intervention delivered to older men electing watchful waiting as their treatment option for localized prostate. The intervention was designed to help these older men incorporate uncertainty into their lives. The sample consists of 41 men who were randomly assigned to either the experimental or control arms of the study. Men in the experimental groups received 5 weekly phone calls from a male nurse. In the control condition, the subject's received naturally occurring care. Watchful waiting is a protocol in which older men with localized prostate cancer (usually men in their 70s) or younger men with chronic illnesses are not offered surgical or radiation treatment but instead are watched on a set schedule. Older men who have elected watchful waiting as their treatment option live every day with the knowledge that they have cancer. Living with untreated prostate cancer induces stress in older men electing watchful waiting because they are uncertain about how long the cancer has been growing and about when and how symptoms may appear. Without markers to indicate disease symptomatology, men may incorrectly attribute physical changes associated with aging to disease progression (Bailey & Mishel, 1999). The sample was 86% Caucasian and 14% African American with an average age of 75.4 years. Their time since diagnosis ranged from 1 month to 124 months. The data to be reported in this presentation is the change over time from baseline (T1) to 2.5 months post-baseline (T2). Repeated measures analyses of variance (ANOVA) were used to test the efficacy of the Living with Uncertainty Intervention (LUI). Men receiving the intervention came to view their lives in a new light (p= .02) when compared with controls using a subscale of the Growth Through Uncertainty Scale. Intervention subjects experienced a decrease in their levels of confusion (p= .04) and depression (p=.06), two mood states measured by the Profile of Mood States over controls from TI to T2. Additionally, intervention subjects reported an improvement in their quality of life over controls (p= .006) and believed their quality of life in the future (six months) would be better than controls (p=.01). The clinical utility of these findings will be discussed in the paper.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:34:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:34:41Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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