Transforming benchmarks into research variables to measure satisfaction with nursing home care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165836
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Transforming benchmarks into research variables to measure satisfaction with nursing home care
Author(s):
Drew, Judith
Author Details:
Judith Drew, Associate Professor, University of Texas Medical Branch School of Nursing, Galveston, Texas, USA, email: jdrew@utmb.edu
Abstract:
Benchmarks are reference points that are used to compare the performance of one process or product against the performance of others. Benchmarking across institutions and services with similar missions and objectives provides individual organizations with information about where they rank along a continuum of best practices performance standards. In today's quality-focused world, many health care organizations need help to identify performance indicators they wish to measure, to structure research-focused quality improvement plans, and to interpret and utilize objective data to plan, implement, and evaluate improvements. With consultation from a university's nursing faculty, a 168-bed nursing home in a large metropolitan are of the south turned a benchmarking endeavor into a systematic program of research that focuses on family satisfaction with nursing home care. Methods used to build this nursing home's quality improvement research program started with the benchmarking tool, "Family Satisfaction Questionnaire for Nursing Homes" (Vital Research, Inc., 1997), developed by a national panel of experts. Family members were asked to indicate how much they agreed or disagreed with statements about: communication patterns in the nursing home, the degree of autonomy their resident has, food quality, problem resolution, overall safety, and the staff's responsiveness to the resident's requests for assistance. Data from two rounds of mailed questionnaires (41% and 52% return rates) provided researchers with specific performance standards that local family members identified as important even though there were substantial differences between local responses and the best practices benchmarks. The next step in transforming benchmarks into research variables involved collecting qualitative narratives from a random sample of family members and using thematic analysis techniques to identify key indicators that would became part of the local nursing home's quality improvement research program. Family members responded to three additional questions: 1) Why does your resident like this nursing home? 2) Why do you like this nursing home? and, 3) What can be done here to make things better for your resident? Recurrent themes found in answers to why residents liked the nursing home included "a friendly environment", "a helpful staff", and having "lots of things to do". Family members liked the nursing home for the "caring attitudes of staff" and the "clean and attractive environment" but wanted to see changes in food and laundry services. The key indicators of performance currently used by this nursing home to measure and critically evaluate family satisfaction with care were transformed from national benchmarks to variables that have significance to the local market.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTransforming benchmarks into research variables to measure satisfaction with nursing home careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDrew, Judithen_US
dc.author.detailsJudith Drew, Associate Professor, University of Texas Medical Branch School of Nursing, Galveston, Texas, USA, email: jdrew@utmb.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165836-
dc.description.abstractBenchmarks are reference points that are used to compare the performance of one process or product against the performance of others. Benchmarking across institutions and services with similar missions and objectives provides individual organizations with information about where they rank along a continuum of best practices performance standards. In today's quality-focused world, many health care organizations need help to identify performance indicators they wish to measure, to structure research-focused quality improvement plans, and to interpret and utilize objective data to plan, implement, and evaluate improvements. With consultation from a university's nursing faculty, a 168-bed nursing home in a large metropolitan are of the south turned a benchmarking endeavor into a systematic program of research that focuses on family satisfaction with nursing home care. Methods used to build this nursing home's quality improvement research program started with the benchmarking tool, "Family Satisfaction Questionnaire for Nursing Homes" (Vital Research, Inc., 1997), developed by a national panel of experts. Family members were asked to indicate how much they agreed or disagreed with statements about: communication patterns in the nursing home, the degree of autonomy their resident has, food quality, problem resolution, overall safety, and the staff's responsiveness to the resident's requests for assistance. Data from two rounds of mailed questionnaires (41% and 52% return rates) provided researchers with specific performance standards that local family members identified as important even though there were substantial differences between local responses and the best practices benchmarks. The next step in transforming benchmarks into research variables involved collecting qualitative narratives from a random sample of family members and using thematic analysis techniques to identify key indicators that would became part of the local nursing home's quality improvement research program. Family members responded to three additional questions: 1) Why does your resident like this nursing home? 2) Why do you like this nursing home? and, 3) What can be done here to make things better for your resident? Recurrent themes found in answers to why residents liked the nursing home included "a friendly environment", "a helpful staff", and having "lots of things to do". Family members liked the nursing home for the "caring attitudes of staff" and the "clean and attractive environment" but wanted to see changes in food and laundry services. The key indicators of performance currently used by this nursing home to measure and critically evaluate family satisfaction with care were transformed from national benchmarks to variables that have significance to the local market.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:34:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:34:43Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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