Web based intervention for pregnancy African-American women: Development and testing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165837
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Web based intervention for pregnancy African-American women: Development and testing
Author(s):
Herman, Joanne
Author Details:
Joanne Herman, PhD, Associate Dean, University of South Carolina-Columbia, College of Nursing, Columbia, South Carolina, USA, email: joanne.herman@sc.edu
Abstract:
Preterm labor is a major health problem for African-American women. Stress is a possible etiological factor. Social support buffers the effects of stress and improves pregnancy outcomes. In addition, women who perceive positive social support exhibit more healthy behaviors when pregnant. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the development and pilot testing of a web based social support intervention for low-income pregnant African-American women. Web based interventions hold great promise as mechanisms to provide care for individuals. However, a digital divide exists. Caucasian middle class individuals use the web more intensively than other ethnic groups. While African-Americans use the web less frequently, they report great confidence in the medium. The web page was designed to provide informational, emotional, and professional social support in a structure and language that would be accessible to low-income African-American women. The web page has only two to three layers of structure with the following informational components: nutrition, physical activity, stress management, and mother and baby growth and development. Emotional support is provided through a spirituality page and a bulletin board. Professional support is provided with an ask-a-nurse component. All components conform to the principles of plain English including pictures to complement text, large amount of white space, use of lists, and fifth grade reading level. The Director of the Literacy Council reviewed the web page while 13 practicing maternity nurses reviewed it for accuracy and two African-American nurses critiqued it for cultural appropriateness. The web page was piloted with four low-income African-American pregnant women who had WebTV installed in their homes and had access to the web page for two months. The women were between 16 and 33 weeks gestation, on Medicaid, and high school graduates. After using the web page for two months an interview schedule was administered. The favorite parts of the sight were a listing of African-American names, mother and baby growth and development, and the "Did You Know" daily hint. The women reported no difficulty moving from page to page and found the web page easy to read. Other findings from the interviews and changes in the web page will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWeb based intervention for pregnancy African-American women: Development and testingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHerman, Joanneen_US
dc.author.detailsJoanne Herman, PhD, Associate Dean, University of South Carolina-Columbia, College of Nursing, Columbia, South Carolina, USA, email: joanne.herman@sc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165837-
dc.description.abstractPreterm labor is a major health problem for African-American women. Stress is a possible etiological factor. Social support buffers the effects of stress and improves pregnancy outcomes. In addition, women who perceive positive social support exhibit more healthy behaviors when pregnant. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the development and pilot testing of a web based social support intervention for low-income pregnant African-American women. Web based interventions hold great promise as mechanisms to provide care for individuals. However, a digital divide exists. Caucasian middle class individuals use the web more intensively than other ethnic groups. While African-Americans use the web less frequently, they report great confidence in the medium. The web page was designed to provide informational, emotional, and professional social support in a structure and language that would be accessible to low-income African-American women. The web page has only two to three layers of structure with the following informational components: nutrition, physical activity, stress management, and mother and baby growth and development. Emotional support is provided through a spirituality page and a bulletin board. Professional support is provided with an ask-a-nurse component. All components conform to the principles of plain English including pictures to complement text, large amount of white space, use of lists, and fifth grade reading level. The Director of the Literacy Council reviewed the web page while 13 practicing maternity nurses reviewed it for accuracy and two African-American nurses critiqued it for cultural appropriateness. The web page was piloted with four low-income African-American pregnant women who had WebTV installed in their homes and had access to the web page for two months. The women were between 16 and 33 weeks gestation, on Medicaid, and high school graduates. After using the web page for two months an interview schedule was administered. The favorite parts of the sight were a listing of African-American names, mother and baby growth and development, and the "Did You Know" daily hint. The women reported no difficulty moving from page to page and found the web page easy to read. Other findings from the interviews and changes in the web page will be discussed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:34:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:34:44Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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