2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165840
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A test of transformational leadership as a values based leadership model
Author(s):
Perkel, Linda
Author Details:
Linda Perkel, PhD, Associate Professor, Barry University School of Nursing, Miami Shores, Florida, USA, email: lperkel@mail.barry.edu
Abstract:
Nurse leaders struggle to provide for the delivery of humanistic and holistic healthcare that is consistent with nursing values in a changing, economic driven health care environment. Leadership experts contend that transformational leadership is the leadership style that can potentiate an organization's chance of survival in these uncertain times. However, transformation, in and of itself, presents us with many choices. The direction an individual or organization chooses is made based on values held by the organization and/or the individual. As organizations change to meet the demands of the current environment, the nurse leader is often conflicted with the opposing values that may be at play. There is concern that nurse executives find it increasingly difficult to reconcile the differences between organizational economics and their personal and professional identities. The question then arises: How will the presence of personal and organizational value incongruence resulting from the conflicting interests of nursing and the organization impact effective nursing leadership? This paper will present the findings of a study whose purpose was to examine the relationship between nurse executives perceived personal and organizational value congruence and their leadership behaviors: transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire. Four hundred eleven nurse executives employed by American Hospital Association hospitals located east of the Mississippi participated in the study. Findings to be presented will provide insight into the values held by nurse executives, the areas of personal and organizational value congruence and conflict perceived by the nurse executives, and the leadership behaviors used by the nurse executives. For example, the findings indicate there is a moderate degree of value congruence between nurse executives' personal and organizational values. However, the degree to which specific values are important are significantly different. Nurse executives report that they most often engage in transformational leadership behaviors but there was no relationship between their leadership behavior and the degree of personal and organizational value congruence. The implications of the findings for nursing administration and nursing education will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA test of transformational leadership as a values based leadership modelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPerkel, Lindaen_US
dc.author.detailsLinda Perkel, PhD, Associate Professor, Barry University School of Nursing, Miami Shores, Florida, USA, email: lperkel@mail.barry.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165840-
dc.description.abstractNurse leaders struggle to provide for the delivery of humanistic and holistic healthcare that is consistent with nursing values in a changing, economic driven health care environment. Leadership experts contend that transformational leadership is the leadership style that can potentiate an organization's chance of survival in these uncertain times. However, transformation, in and of itself, presents us with many choices. The direction an individual or organization chooses is made based on values held by the organization and/or the individual. As organizations change to meet the demands of the current environment, the nurse leader is often conflicted with the opposing values that may be at play. There is concern that nurse executives find it increasingly difficult to reconcile the differences between organizational economics and their personal and professional identities. The question then arises: How will the presence of personal and organizational value incongruence resulting from the conflicting interests of nursing and the organization impact effective nursing leadership? This paper will present the findings of a study whose purpose was to examine the relationship between nurse executives perceived personal and organizational value congruence and their leadership behaviors: transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire. Four hundred eleven nurse executives employed by American Hospital Association hospitals located east of the Mississippi participated in the study. Findings to be presented will provide insight into the values held by nurse executives, the areas of personal and organizational value congruence and conflict perceived by the nurse executives, and the leadership behaviors used by the nurse executives. For example, the findings indicate there is a moderate degree of value congruence between nurse executives' personal and organizational values. However, the degree to which specific values are important are significantly different. Nurse executives report that they most often engage in transformational leadership behaviors but there was no relationship between their leadership behavior and the degree of personal and organizational value congruence. The implications of the findings for nursing administration and nursing education will be discussed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:34:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:34:47Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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