2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165841
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Immunologic mediators in allergic rhinitis and sleep
Author(s):
Krouse, Helene
Author Details:
Helene Krouse, PhD, Assistant Dean, Wayne State University College of Nursing, Detroit, Michigan, USA, email: hjkrouse@wayne.edu
Abstract:
Many patients with allergic rhinitis experience increased symptoms in the first few hours upon awakening, which maybe related to proinflammatory cytokine fluctuations during sleep. Daytime somnolence, fatigue, and malaise often reported by patients with allergic rhinitis may be a result of alterations in cytokine levels and disruptions in sleep patterns. This pilot study used a descriptive, correlational design to examine the relationship between cytokine levels, sleep architecture and sleep continuity patterns, and allergic symptoms in allergic and non-allergic subjects to further delineate the physiological mechanisms that contribute to the sequella of allergic disease. Four allergic and four non-allergic subjects were enrolled in the study and underwent two nights of polysomnographic recordings. The first night was an adaptation night. On the second night of sleep, serum cytokines were obtained prior to sleep, during NONREM and REM sleep, upon final awakening, and one hour after final awakening. Subjects also completed measures of sleep quality, allergic symptoms, and quality of life scales. Findings revealed that three cytokines, interleukins (IL) 1(, IL-4, and IL-10, termed pro-allergic cytokines, were higher in allergic subjects and three cytokines, IL-1ra, IL-2, and IL-12, termed allergy-inhibitory cytokines , were higher in nonallergic subjects. In relationship to the sleep parameters, the three allergy-inhibitory cytokines strongly correlated with REM latency and negatively correlated with time spent in REM sleep. Nonallergic subjects had a slightly greater sleep latency and spent more time in stage 1 sleep than allergic subjects. Allergic subjects required twice as much time to enter REM sleep and spent less time in REM sleep than the nonallergic subjects. Significant negative correlations were found between levels of IL-1ra, IL-2, and IL-12 and allergy symptoms. This suggests that allergic symptoms and quality of life impairment are associated with decreased levels of these allergy-inhibitor cytokines and are not associated with elevated levels of the pro-allergic cytokines.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImmunologic mediators in allergic rhinitis and sleepen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKrouse, Heleneen_US
dc.author.detailsHelene Krouse, PhD, Assistant Dean, Wayne State University College of Nursing, Detroit, Michigan, USA, email: hjkrouse@wayne.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165841-
dc.description.abstractMany patients with allergic rhinitis experience increased symptoms in the first few hours upon awakening, which maybe related to proinflammatory cytokine fluctuations during sleep. Daytime somnolence, fatigue, and malaise often reported by patients with allergic rhinitis may be a result of alterations in cytokine levels and disruptions in sleep patterns. This pilot study used a descriptive, correlational design to examine the relationship between cytokine levels, sleep architecture and sleep continuity patterns, and allergic symptoms in allergic and non-allergic subjects to further delineate the physiological mechanisms that contribute to the sequella of allergic disease. Four allergic and four non-allergic subjects were enrolled in the study and underwent two nights of polysomnographic recordings. The first night was an adaptation night. On the second night of sleep, serum cytokines were obtained prior to sleep, during NONREM and REM sleep, upon final awakening, and one hour after final awakening. Subjects also completed measures of sleep quality, allergic symptoms, and quality of life scales. Findings revealed that three cytokines, interleukins (IL) 1(, IL-4, and IL-10, termed pro-allergic cytokines, were higher in allergic subjects and three cytokines, IL-1ra, IL-2, and IL-12, termed allergy-inhibitory cytokines , were higher in nonallergic subjects. In relationship to the sleep parameters, the three allergy-inhibitory cytokines strongly correlated with REM latency and negatively correlated with time spent in REM sleep. Nonallergic subjects had a slightly greater sleep latency and spent more time in stage 1 sleep than allergic subjects. Allergic subjects required twice as much time to enter REM sleep and spent less time in REM sleep than the nonallergic subjects. Significant negative correlations were found between levels of IL-1ra, IL-2, and IL-12 and allergy symptoms. This suggests that allergic symptoms and quality of life impairment are associated with decreased levels of these allergy-inhibitor cytokines and are not associated with elevated levels of the pro-allergic cytokines.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:34:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:34:49Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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