2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165843
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Animal models of psychoneuroimmunology research
Author(s):
Page, Gayle
Author Details:
Gayle Page DNS/DNSc/DSN, Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: gpage@son.jhmi.edu
Abstract:
Animal models use conditions that are analogous to conditions of humans in an effort to simulate biobehavioral processes that occur in human populations and to make those processes more accessible for study. There are many positives and negatives that must be balanced when considering the employment of an animal model for nursing research. This presentation will introduce some issues with regard to the use of animal models for PNI research and an overview of the range of animal models that are currently used. Finally, to provide an illustration of several parallels between disease in humans and animals, the biological characteristics of the MADB106 tumor model of breast cancer metastasis will be compared to what is known about the metastatic process in humans. Studies investigating the impact of painful stress on susceptibility to metastasis will be discussed to illustrate the usefulness of the MADB106 tumor model in implicating possible biologic consequences of pain in humans.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAnimal models of psychoneuroimmunology researchen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPage, Gayleen_US
dc.author.detailsGayle Page DNS/DNSc/DSN, Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: gpage@son.jhmi.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165843-
dc.description.abstractAnimal models use conditions that are analogous to conditions of humans in an effort to simulate biobehavioral processes that occur in human populations and to make those processes more accessible for study. There are many positives and negatives that must be balanced when considering the employment of an animal model for nursing research. This presentation will introduce some issues with regard to the use of animal models for PNI research and an overview of the range of animal models that are currently used. Finally, to provide an illustration of several parallels between disease in humans and animals, the biological characteristics of the MADB106 tumor model of breast cancer metastasis will be compared to what is known about the metastatic process in humans. Studies investigating the impact of painful stress on susceptibility to metastasis will be discussed to illustrate the usefulness of the MADB106 tumor model in implicating possible biologic consequences of pain in humans.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:34:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:34:51Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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