2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165844
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychoneuroimmunology of the maternal-infant dyad
Author(s):
Groer, Maureen
Author Details:
Maureen Groer, PhD, Program Director, University of Tennessee College of Nursing, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA, email: mgroer@utk.edu
Abstract:
Connections between maternal stress and immunity have been identified in several species. Maternal stress in turn may produce deleterious stress responses in the infant. Such stress states have the potential for producing immunological consequences in both the mother and the infant. We found relationships between length of labor, anxiety, and immune markers in mothers, as well as increased illness in mothers and infants of mothers who had the greatest drop in post-parturient salivary IgA. This led us to several other studies in which we found that maternal milk IgA was inversely correlated with milk cortisol in early preterm milk, early term milk, and milk from mothers at 4 weeks postpartum. Animal work has also been carried out as part of this program of maternal-infant PNI research. We have performed a maternal deprivation pilot study in BALB/C mice and found that simulated maternal licking and grooming of deprived pups appeared to produce T cell immunoenhancement in the separated pups. Our latest study is one that is ongoing, and is examining the psychoneuroendocrinology and psychoneuroimmunology of lactation in human mothers. We are studying the HPA axis and humoral, secretory, and cellular immunity in fully lactating compared to non-lactating mothers at week 4 postpartum. Our aim is to determine if the natural diminished stress reactivity response that is well described in lactating animals also is present in human mothers, and if there are immune differences and differences in infectious illnesses between breast and bottle feeding mothers. Data on 32 mothers indicates a decreased stress response to naturalistic stress, a higher lymphocyte proliferation to conconavalin A, higher serum IgA, and fewer symptoms of infection in lactating compared to non-lactating mothers. Maternal stress and infectious illnesses also appear to be related both in mothers and infants.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychoneuroimmunology of the maternal-infant dyaden_GB
dc.contributor.authorGroer, Maureenen_US
dc.author.detailsMaureen Groer, PhD, Program Director, University of Tennessee College of Nursing, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA, email: mgroer@utk.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165844-
dc.description.abstractConnections between maternal stress and immunity have been identified in several species. Maternal stress in turn may produce deleterious stress responses in the infant. Such stress states have the potential for producing immunological consequences in both the mother and the infant. We found relationships between length of labor, anxiety, and immune markers in mothers, as well as increased illness in mothers and infants of mothers who had the greatest drop in post-parturient salivary IgA. This led us to several other studies in which we found that maternal milk IgA was inversely correlated with milk cortisol in early preterm milk, early term milk, and milk from mothers at 4 weeks postpartum. Animal work has also been carried out as part of this program of maternal-infant PNI research. We have performed a maternal deprivation pilot study in BALB/C mice and found that simulated maternal licking and grooming of deprived pups appeared to produce T cell immunoenhancement in the separated pups. Our latest study is one that is ongoing, and is examining the psychoneuroendocrinology and psychoneuroimmunology of lactation in human mothers. We are studying the HPA axis and humoral, secretory, and cellular immunity in fully lactating compared to non-lactating mothers at week 4 postpartum. Our aim is to determine if the natural diminished stress reactivity response that is well described in lactating animals also is present in human mothers, and if there are immune differences and differences in infectious illnesses between breast and bottle feeding mothers. Data on 32 mothers indicates a decreased stress response to naturalistic stress, a higher lymphocyte proliferation to conconavalin A, higher serum IgA, and fewer symptoms of infection in lactating compared to non-lactating mothers. Maternal stress and infectious illnesses also appear to be related both in mothers and infants.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:34:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:34:53Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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