2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165849
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Emotional distress and prenatal attachment in pregnancy after perinatal loss
Author(s):
Armstrong, Deborah
Author Details:
Deborah Armstrong, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Louisville School of Nursing, Louisville, Kentucky, USA, email: deborah.armstrong@louisville.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this research was to examine the effects of emotional distress arising from a history of previous perinatal loss on the development of prenatal attachment in a subsequent pregnancy. The incidence of early miscarriage (before 20 weeks gestation) ranges from 10 to 20 per 100 pregnancies; late pregnancy loss is estimated at 2 per 100 (Woods & Woods, 1997). Methods: A three-group comparative design was used. The sample consisted of parents experiencing their first pregnancy (n = 30 couples), those with prior successful pregnancies (n = 33 couples), and those with a history of perinatal loss (n = 40 couples). Assessments of the association of impact of previous loss (Impact of Event Scale; Horowitz, Wilner, & Alverez, 1979), with depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale; Radloff, 1977), pregnancy-specific anxiety (Pregnancy Outcome Questionnaire, Theut, Pederson, Zaslow, & Rabinovich, 1988), and prenatal attachment (Prenatal Attachment Inventory; Muller, 1993) were conducted during structured telephone interviews. The data were analyzed using descriptive and correlational analyses, and multiple regression. Results: Parents with a history of prior perinatal loss had higher depressive symptoms and pregnancy-specific anxiety than parents from either of the comparison groups; mothers scored higher than fathers in all groups. Using the Impact of Event scale to measure the influence of the loss on parents experience during the current pregnancy, 89% of the parents scored in the high impact range (score > 19). Impact of the previous loss was significantly correlated with both depressive symptoms (r = .53, p < .0001) and prenatal anxiety (r = .47, p < .0001). Parents with and without a history of perinatal loss did not differ on their level of prenatal attachment during the current pregnancy. The best model for prenatal attachment contained depressive symptoms, pregnancy-specific anxiety, gender of parent, and age and explained only 18% of the variance in prenatal attachment. Conclusions: These findings do not support the influence of depressive symptoms and pregnancy-specific anxiety on the developing relationship between parents and their unborn infant in a pregnancy after loss. However, they do provide insight into the continuing influence of parents' previous loss experience on their emotions in a subsequent pregnancy. Methods to reduce this emotional distress should be tested in future research. Families should be followed after the birth of a subsequent child to examine the long-term influence of prior perinatal loss on this new parent-child relationship.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmotional distress and prenatal attachment in pregnancy after perinatal lossen_GB
dc.contributor.authorArmstrong, Deborahen_US
dc.author.detailsDeborah Armstrong, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Louisville School of Nursing, Louisville, Kentucky, USA, email: deborah.armstrong@louisville.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165849-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this research was to examine the effects of emotional distress arising from a history of previous perinatal loss on the development of prenatal attachment in a subsequent pregnancy. The incidence of early miscarriage (before 20 weeks gestation) ranges from 10 to 20 per 100 pregnancies; late pregnancy loss is estimated at 2 per 100 (Woods & Woods, 1997). Methods: A three-group comparative design was used. The sample consisted of parents experiencing their first pregnancy (n = 30 couples), those with prior successful pregnancies (n = 33 couples), and those with a history of perinatal loss (n = 40 couples). Assessments of the association of impact of previous loss (Impact of Event Scale; Horowitz, Wilner, & Alverez, 1979), with depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale; Radloff, 1977), pregnancy-specific anxiety (Pregnancy Outcome Questionnaire, Theut, Pederson, Zaslow, & Rabinovich, 1988), and prenatal attachment (Prenatal Attachment Inventory; Muller, 1993) were conducted during structured telephone interviews. The data were analyzed using descriptive and correlational analyses, and multiple regression. Results: Parents with a history of prior perinatal loss had higher depressive symptoms and pregnancy-specific anxiety than parents from either of the comparison groups; mothers scored higher than fathers in all groups. Using the Impact of Event scale to measure the influence of the loss on parents experience during the current pregnancy, 89% of the parents scored in the high impact range (score > 19). Impact of the previous loss was significantly correlated with both depressive symptoms (r = .53, p < .0001) and prenatal anxiety (r = .47, p < .0001). Parents with and without a history of perinatal loss did not differ on their level of prenatal attachment during the current pregnancy. The best model for prenatal attachment contained depressive symptoms, pregnancy-specific anxiety, gender of parent, and age and explained only 18% of the variance in prenatal attachment. Conclusions: These findings do not support the influence of depressive symptoms and pregnancy-specific anxiety on the developing relationship between parents and their unborn infant in a pregnancy after loss. However, they do provide insight into the continuing influence of parents' previous loss experience on their emotions in a subsequent pregnancy. Methods to reduce this emotional distress should be tested in future research. Families should be followed after the birth of a subsequent child to examine the long-term influence of prior perinatal loss on this new parent-child relationship.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:34:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:34:59Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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