2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165851
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health behaviors of 18- to 24-year old college students
Author(s):
Staten, Ruth
Author Details:
Ruth Staten, PhD, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA, email: rrstat00@pop.uky.edu
Abstract:
Overview: Two-thirds of all deaths are related to preventable factors such as tobacco and alcohol use, injury and over-nutrition. Data from the Centers for Disease Control 1995 National College Health Risk Behavior Survey (NCHRBS), which monitors health risk behaviors among US college and university undergraduates, indicate that many college students engage in behaviors that place them at risk for serious health problems. NCHRBS examined six categories of priority health-risk behaviors among college students: 1) behaviors that contribute to unintentional and intentional injuries; 2) tobacco use; and 3) alcohol and other drug use; 4) sexual behaviors; 5) unhealthy dietary behaviors; and 6) physical inactivity. In order to influence these behaviors, health promotion and protection activities and preventive services are most effective when designed for the target population. The focus of this integrative paper is to describe the health behaviors of college students with attention to health and risk behaviors. Despite spite the above initiative (CDC, ACHA), some detriments to health have been neglected. Three additional papers will discuss these neglected areas. The mental health concerns of college women will be examined. The psychological, social, academic, and health impact of divorce on college students will be explored. The prevalence of college student cigarette use is on the rise, therefore smoking behaviors and quit patterns will be described. The presenters will examine each of the areas of concern and discuss future prevention research priorities. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe patterns of health behaviors among 18- to 24-year-old college students. Methods: This is a descriptive, cross-sectional mailed survey of a random sample of students (n = 531) on a Southeastern campus. Students who were 18- to 24- years of age were included in the analysis. These data were collected as part of a larger study. A 49% response rate was obtained. The questionnaire is an adaptation of the Centers for Disease Control survey, National College Health Risk Behavior Survey (NCHRBS). This survey is used nationally to assess college students' health risk behaviors. Questions include demographic information, health behaviors related to safety, violence, drugs and alcohol, sexual practices, nutrition, exercise and sleep. Findings: The findings included high-risk behavior by college students in the expected areas of alcohol and sex: 1) of those who drank 67% binge drank; 2) of those who were sexually active 50% never used condoms; and 3) of current smokers (33%) 44% began smoking after age 18. In addition, findings that indicate increased patterns of tobacco use and concerns about mental health will also be presented. Conclusion: Despite prevention emphasis on specific high-risk behaviors, college students continue to make choices that place them at risk for immediate and long-term consequences. Other areas have had little exploration. It is imperative that effective strategies be developed and tested to promote health and prevent illness and injury in college students.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth behaviors of 18- to 24-year old college studentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStaten, Ruthen_US
dc.author.detailsRuth Staten, PhD, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA, email: rrstat00@pop.uky.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165851-
dc.description.abstractOverview: Two-thirds of all deaths are related to preventable factors such as tobacco and alcohol use, injury and over-nutrition. Data from the Centers for Disease Control 1995 National College Health Risk Behavior Survey (NCHRBS), which monitors health risk behaviors among US college and university undergraduates, indicate that many college students engage in behaviors that place them at risk for serious health problems. NCHRBS examined six categories of priority health-risk behaviors among college students: 1) behaviors that contribute to unintentional and intentional injuries; 2) tobacco use; and 3) alcohol and other drug use; 4) sexual behaviors; 5) unhealthy dietary behaviors; and 6) physical inactivity. In order to influence these behaviors, health promotion and protection activities and preventive services are most effective when designed for the target population. The focus of this integrative paper is to describe the health behaviors of college students with attention to health and risk behaviors. Despite spite the above initiative (CDC, ACHA), some detriments to health have been neglected. Three additional papers will discuss these neglected areas. The mental health concerns of college women will be examined. The psychological, social, academic, and health impact of divorce on college students will be explored. The prevalence of college student cigarette use is on the rise, therefore smoking behaviors and quit patterns will be described. The presenters will examine each of the areas of concern and discuss future prevention research priorities. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe patterns of health behaviors among 18- to 24-year-old college students. Methods: This is a descriptive, cross-sectional mailed survey of a random sample of students (n = 531) on a Southeastern campus. Students who were 18- to 24- years of age were included in the analysis. These data were collected as part of a larger study. A 49% response rate was obtained. The questionnaire is an adaptation of the Centers for Disease Control survey, National College Health Risk Behavior Survey (NCHRBS). This survey is used nationally to assess college students' health risk behaviors. Questions include demographic information, health behaviors related to safety, violence, drugs and alcohol, sexual practices, nutrition, exercise and sleep. Findings: The findings included high-risk behavior by college students in the expected areas of alcohol and sex: 1) of those who drank 67% binge drank; 2) of those who were sexually active 50% never used condoms; and 3) of current smokers (33%) 44% began smoking after age 18. In addition, findings that indicate increased patterns of tobacco use and concerns about mental health will also be presented. Conclusion: Despite prevention emphasis on specific high-risk behaviors, college students continue to make choices that place them at risk for immediate and long-term consequences. Other areas have had little exploration. It is imperative that effective strategies be developed and tested to promote health and prevent illness and injury in college students.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:35:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:35:02Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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