2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165852
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Smoking Behaviors and Cessation Attempts Among College Students
Author(s):
Ridner, Lee
Author Details:
Lee Ridner, Assistant Professor, University of Louisville School of Nursing, Louisville, Kentucky, USA, email: lee.ridner@louisville.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The recent increase in the prevalence rate of smoking among college-age students has left many college health providers seeking new ways to deal with an old problem - tobacco addiction. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine smoking behaviors and quit patterns among college students ages 18 to 24 years. In addition, the relationship between demographic characteristics, smoking behaviors and attempts of quit smoking were explored. Using the Transtheoretical Model, stages of change in college age smokers were identified. Unsuccessful cessation methods and the pros and cons of smoking cessation were described. Methods: A non-experimental cross-sectional design was used to explore the factors affecting smoking behaviors and quit patterns in college-age smokers. A convenience sample of 72 university students 18- to- 24 years- old who had smoked at least 100 cigarettes while in college was recruited from the University of Louisville Student Health Services. All were current smokers (smoked within the last 30 days). Subjects self-reported using a 22-item multiple choice and open-ended pencil/paper questionnaire. The questionnaire contained 13 items from the Youth Tobacco Survey 2000 Core Questionnaire (CDC, 1999), two questions that established the smoker intent to quit smoking by the stage of change, five questions developed by the investigator, and two open ended questions exploring the pros and cons of quitting. For the open ended questions, all questionnaires were reviewed, themes identified, and the responses coded into discrete categories. Findings: Subjects were separated into three stages of change using the Transtheoretical Model. Precontemplators (subjects not planning to quit smoking in the next 6 months) accounted for 32% of participants; 26% were contemplating quitting in the next 6 months, and 42% were in the preparation stage and planned to stop in the next 30 days. Of the subjects who had attempted to quit smoking, 88% used "cold turkey" during their last quit attempt. An overwhelming 94% of subjects who identified both pros and cons of smoking cessation reported "health" as a reason to quit smoking. A logistic regression revealed the most significant predictors of whether or not an attempt to quit smoking occurred during the past year were the financial impact of quitting (90% more likely to made an attempt) and the possibility of weight gain (5.4 times more likely not to have made an attempt). Conclusions: The students appeared to be highly motivated and ready to change their behaviors. The majority of the students (94%) had been exposed to health messages; however, this did not have a significant impact on smoking cessation. This research supports tailoring the message to address the concerns of college student smokers. The findings suggest interventions that address the financial impact of smoking and weight gain concerns may yield the greatest results.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSmoking Behaviors and Cessation Attempts Among College Studentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRidner, Leeen_US
dc.author.detailsLee Ridner, Assistant Professor, University of Louisville School of Nursing, Louisville, Kentucky, USA, email: lee.ridner@louisville.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165852-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The recent increase in the prevalence rate of smoking among college-age students has left many college health providers seeking new ways to deal with an old problem - tobacco addiction. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine smoking behaviors and quit patterns among college students ages 18 to 24 years. In addition, the relationship between demographic characteristics, smoking behaviors and attempts of quit smoking were explored. Using the Transtheoretical Model, stages of change in college age smokers were identified. Unsuccessful cessation methods and the pros and cons of smoking cessation were described. Methods: A non-experimental cross-sectional design was used to explore the factors affecting smoking behaviors and quit patterns in college-age smokers. A convenience sample of 72 university students 18- to- 24 years- old who had smoked at least 100 cigarettes while in college was recruited from the University of Louisville Student Health Services. All were current smokers (smoked within the last 30 days). Subjects self-reported using a 22-item multiple choice and open-ended pencil/paper questionnaire. The questionnaire contained 13 items from the Youth Tobacco Survey 2000 Core Questionnaire (CDC, 1999), two questions that established the smoker intent to quit smoking by the stage of change, five questions developed by the investigator, and two open ended questions exploring the pros and cons of quitting. For the open ended questions, all questionnaires were reviewed, themes identified, and the responses coded into discrete categories. Findings: Subjects were separated into three stages of change using the Transtheoretical Model. Precontemplators (subjects not planning to quit smoking in the next 6 months) accounted for 32% of participants; 26% were contemplating quitting in the next 6 months, and 42% were in the preparation stage and planned to stop in the next 30 days. Of the subjects who had attempted to quit smoking, 88% used "cold turkey" during their last quit attempt. An overwhelming 94% of subjects who identified both pros and cons of smoking cessation reported "health" as a reason to quit smoking. A logistic regression revealed the most significant predictors of whether or not an attempt to quit smoking occurred during the past year were the financial impact of quitting (90% more likely to made an attempt) and the possibility of weight gain (5.4 times more likely not to have made an attempt). Conclusions: The students appeared to be highly motivated and ready to change their behaviors. The majority of the students (94%) had been exposed to health messages; however, this did not have a significant impact on smoking cessation. This research supports tailoring the message to address the concerns of college student smokers. The findings suggest interventions that address the financial impact of smoking and weight gain concerns may yield the greatest results.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:35:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:35:04Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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