2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165854
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Intimate Relationships on the Mental Health of College Women
Author(s):
Hall, Lynne
Author Details:
Lynne Hall, DPH/DrPH, Assistant Dean of Research and Doctoral Studies, University of Kentucky College of Nursing, Lexington, Kentucky, USA, email: lahall@pop.uky.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the association of the quality of past and current primary intimate relationships with depressive symptoms, negative thinking, and self-esteem in college women ages 18 to 24 years. The quality of parenting received in childhood is associated with depression in adulthood and influences intimate relationships. College women often identify their mothers and boyfriends as their primary intimate. Women who possess a positive sense of self describe healthier intimate relationships. Methods: A sample of 246 women was recruited from a university student population. Inclusion criteria were: full-time student status; no prior treatment for psychiatric illness; not now or ever on antidepressants; never diagnosed with clinical depression; not suicidal; single or never married; and no dependent children. Baseline data were collected on the Center of Epidemiologic Studies - Depression Scale (CES-D) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI); the Autonomy and Relatedness Inventory (ARI), which measures the quality of the primary intimate relationship and includes eight subscales; the Rosenberg Self-esteem Inventory, and the Crandell Cognitions Inventory which measures negative thinking. Data were collected via self-report and analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-tests, and correlational analysis. Findings: The majority of the women named their boyfriend (33%) or their mother (27%) as the primary intimate. In the entire group of 246 women, the better the quality of the woman's current primary intimate relationship, the fewer her depressive symptoms (CES-D r = -.39, p < .0001; BDI r = -.46, p < .0001), and negative thoughts (r = -.44, p < .0001) and the greater her self-esteem (r = .40, p < .0001). Among women who indicated their mother as primary intimate, the relationship between self-esteem and each of the ARI subscales was very strong, particularly for the subscales of rejection, control, and hostile control (r ranges 0.48 to 0.52; p < .0001). Among women who indicated their boyfriend as primary intimate, depressive symptoms and negative thinking were both more strongly correlated with the quality of the primary intimate relationship than was self-esteem. Conclusions: The quality of the relationship that college women have with boyfriends and mothers does effect their mental health. Those women with few depressive symptoms, a positive self-esteem, and minimal negative thinking are more likely to describe their intimate relationships as positive. Future research that tests interventions to improve college women's mental health may also improve their intimate relationships.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Intimate Relationships on the Mental Health of College Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHall, Lynneen_US
dc.author.detailsLynne Hall, DPH/DrPH, Assistant Dean of Research and Doctoral Studies, University of Kentucky College of Nursing, Lexington, Kentucky, USA, email: lahall@pop.uky.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165854-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the association of the quality of past and current primary intimate relationships with depressive symptoms, negative thinking, and self-esteem in college women ages 18 to 24 years. The quality of parenting received in childhood is associated with depression in adulthood and influences intimate relationships. College women often identify their mothers and boyfriends as their primary intimate. Women who possess a positive sense of self describe healthier intimate relationships. Methods: A sample of 246 women was recruited from a university student population. Inclusion criteria were: full-time student status; no prior treatment for psychiatric illness; not now or ever on antidepressants; never diagnosed with clinical depression; not suicidal; single or never married; and no dependent children. Baseline data were collected on the Center of Epidemiologic Studies - Depression Scale (CES-D) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI); the Autonomy and Relatedness Inventory (ARI), which measures the quality of the primary intimate relationship and includes eight subscales; the Rosenberg Self-esteem Inventory, and the Crandell Cognitions Inventory which measures negative thinking. Data were collected via self-report and analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-tests, and correlational analysis. Findings: The majority of the women named their boyfriend (33%) or their mother (27%) as the primary intimate. In the entire group of 246 women, the better the quality of the woman's current primary intimate relationship, the fewer her depressive symptoms (CES-D r = -.39, p < .0001; BDI r = -.46, p < .0001), and negative thoughts (r = -.44, p < .0001) and the greater her self-esteem (r = .40, p < .0001). Among women who indicated their mother as primary intimate, the relationship between self-esteem and each of the ARI subscales was very strong, particularly for the subscales of rejection, control, and hostile control (r ranges 0.48 to 0.52; p < .0001). Among women who indicated their boyfriend as primary intimate, depressive symptoms and negative thinking were both more strongly correlated with the quality of the primary intimate relationship than was self-esteem. Conclusions: The quality of the relationship that college women have with boyfriends and mothers does effect their mental health. Those women with few depressive symptoms, a positive self-esteem, and minimal negative thinking are more likely to describe their intimate relationships as positive. Future research that tests interventions to improve college women's mental health may also improve their intimate relationships.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:35:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:35:06Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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