Interactions of autistic children and their parents: A comparison of clinic vs. home sessions

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165859
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Interactions of autistic children and their parents: A comparison of clinic vs. home sessions
Author(s):
Elder, Jennifer
Author Details:
Jennifer Elder, Associate Professor, University of Florida College of Nursing, Gainesville, Florida, USA, email: elderjh@nursing.ufl.edu
Abstract:
Autism or "autistic spectrum disorder"(ASD) is a mysterious condition with uncertain etiology and treatment. Rarely diagnosed conclusively before 24 months of age, children with ASD usually receive their initial evaluations in clinical settings. One of the hallmarks of this disorder is the child's difficulty with change and unfamiliar settings. Therefore, it has been suggested that evaluations in unfamiliar clinic settings may yield invalid findings and lead to delays in diagnosis as well as diagnostic error. One aim of this NINR-funded study was to study the effect of setting by comparing the interactions of children with ASD and their parents in clinics versus homes. Employing a newly developed videotaping and coding procedure, these investigators collected data from 40 parent-child dyads during play sessions in both clinic and home settings. Initial results using single subject experimentation methodology yielded significant differences in child and parent behaviors and support the view that the setting does affect child behavior as well as parent-child interactions. Another interesting finding was interaction differences of the father-child and mother-child dyads within individual families. Traditionally mothers have been the major recipients of parent training and little is known about interactions of fathers and their autistic children. Therefore, this finding not only has clinical significance for diagnosticians but also for those engaged in developing and implementing parent-training interventions that are appropriate for both fathers and mothers. As striking as individual differences were during preliminary analyses, it is interesting to note that individuals differences were not readily detected when data were grouped during secondary data analyses using more traditional statistical procedures (RANOVA). These results have important implications for nurse researchers and clinicians who may employ both analysis procedures in order to draw clinically applicable conclusions. The investigators will conclude this presentation by discussing benefits of combining single subject experimentation with more traditional group comparative methods, reasons why results may vary using these different approaches, and how results from this study are currently being used to further develop a comprehensive in-home family training package for children with ASD. This information is critically important to researchers of human behavior as well as pediatric, school health, and mental health nurses seeking to provide the most appropriate interventions for this and other vulnerable groups of children and families.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInteractions of autistic children and their parents: A comparison of clinic vs. home sessionsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorElder, Jenniferen_US
dc.author.detailsJennifer Elder, Associate Professor, University of Florida College of Nursing, Gainesville, Florida, USA, email: elderjh@nursing.ufl.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165859-
dc.description.abstractAutism or "autistic spectrum disorder"(ASD) is a mysterious condition with uncertain etiology and treatment. Rarely diagnosed conclusively before 24 months of age, children with ASD usually receive their initial evaluations in clinical settings. One of the hallmarks of this disorder is the child's difficulty with change and unfamiliar settings. Therefore, it has been suggested that evaluations in unfamiliar clinic settings may yield invalid findings and lead to delays in diagnosis as well as diagnostic error. One aim of this NINR-funded study was to study the effect of setting by comparing the interactions of children with ASD and their parents in clinics versus homes. Employing a newly developed videotaping and coding procedure, these investigators collected data from 40 parent-child dyads during play sessions in both clinic and home settings. Initial results using single subject experimentation methodology yielded significant differences in child and parent behaviors and support the view that the setting does affect child behavior as well as parent-child interactions. Another interesting finding was interaction differences of the father-child and mother-child dyads within individual families. Traditionally mothers have been the major recipients of parent training and little is known about interactions of fathers and their autistic children. Therefore, this finding not only has clinical significance for diagnosticians but also for those engaged in developing and implementing parent-training interventions that are appropriate for both fathers and mothers. As striking as individual differences were during preliminary analyses, it is interesting to note that individuals differences were not readily detected when data were grouped during secondary data analyses using more traditional statistical procedures (RANOVA). These results have important implications for nurse researchers and clinicians who may employ both analysis procedures in order to draw clinically applicable conclusions. The investigators will conclude this presentation by discussing benefits of combining single subject experimentation with more traditional group comparative methods, reasons why results may vary using these different approaches, and how results from this study are currently being used to further develop a comprehensive in-home family training package for children with ASD. This information is critically important to researchers of human behavior as well as pediatric, school health, and mental health nurses seeking to provide the most appropriate interventions for this and other vulnerable groups of children and families.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:35:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:35:13Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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