What Children Are Bringing to School Besides Books: Children's Concerns Expressed to School Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165864
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
What Children Are Bringing to School Besides Books: Children's Concerns Expressed to School Nurses
Author(s):
Best, Mary
Author Details:
Mary Best, Assistant Professor, University of Texas Medical Branch School of Nursing, Galveston, Texas, USA, email: mbest@utmb.edu
Abstract:
Once considered "safe havens" from violence, schools in the United States are currently experiencing heightened youth violence and crime. Promoting safe schools has become a national priority. Traditionally, violence has been viewed as a social problem to be dealt with primarily by the law enforcement and judicial systems. However, in recent years violence has been recognized as a major public health problem requiring the involvement of health care professionals such as the school nurse in violence prevention efforts. Often, the school nurse is the person students feel safe to go to when they want to talk about their problems. As part of a study that investigated violence in schools, school nurses were asked to identify the three most common concerns expressed to them by children in their schools. This presentation will focus on the findings from a content of the types of children's concerns identified by the school nurses. The convenience sample consisted of five hundred and seventy school nurses who completed a survey instrument on two consecutive years while attending a school nurse conference. The typical participant was Caucasian, 48 years old, and held an associate or baccalaureate degree in nursing. The average number of years of experience in nursing was 21 years and 10 years as a school nurse. Most of the nurses worked an average of 40 hours per week and were responsible for an average of 1,108 students in schools located in cities or suburbs. They represented all school settings. The nurses were fairly evenly split on whether they were in schools where the families were of middle of lower income level. Most nurses who were assigned to multiple schools were assigned to an average of two schools and spent, on average each week, two days in each school. All responses were reduced to singular units for coding. Using content analysis and iterative clustering, 703 responses (92% of the total responses) were grouped by similarity of topic and categories identified. Responses and categories were given to a second researcher for classification of responses. Inter-rater agreement was 93%. The topic categories were further reduced for parsimony. Content categories were grouped according to the following five major themes: relationships, home life, threats to well being, social influences/peer pressures, and miscellaneous. Threats to well being was the category into which 91% of the responses could be classified. Topics in this category included abuse, neglect, health concerns, personal/emotional problems, depression, and parental discipline/punishment. Implications for nurses employed in any setting which focuses on children include assessing children for risk of exposure to violence abuse (self, domestic, school, community); personal/emotional problems; neglect; risk taking behavior related to social influences/peer pressures; and problems related to family, school, and peers.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhat Children Are Bringing to School Besides Books: Children's Concerns Expressed to School Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBest, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Best, Assistant Professor, University of Texas Medical Branch School of Nursing, Galveston, Texas, USA, email: mbest@utmb.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165864-
dc.description.abstractOnce considered "safe havens" from violence, schools in the United States are currently experiencing heightened youth violence and crime. Promoting safe schools has become a national priority. Traditionally, violence has been viewed as a social problem to be dealt with primarily by the law enforcement and judicial systems. However, in recent years violence has been recognized as a major public health problem requiring the involvement of health care professionals such as the school nurse in violence prevention efforts. Often, the school nurse is the person students feel safe to go to when they want to talk about their problems. As part of a study that investigated violence in schools, school nurses were asked to identify the three most common concerns expressed to them by children in their schools. This presentation will focus on the findings from a content of the types of children's concerns identified by the school nurses. The convenience sample consisted of five hundred and seventy school nurses who completed a survey instrument on two consecutive years while attending a school nurse conference. The typical participant was Caucasian, 48 years old, and held an associate or baccalaureate degree in nursing. The average number of years of experience in nursing was 21 years and 10 years as a school nurse. Most of the nurses worked an average of 40 hours per week and were responsible for an average of 1,108 students in schools located in cities or suburbs. They represented all school settings. The nurses were fairly evenly split on whether they were in schools where the families were of middle of lower income level. Most nurses who were assigned to multiple schools were assigned to an average of two schools and spent, on average each week, two days in each school. All responses were reduced to singular units for coding. Using content analysis and iterative clustering, 703 responses (92% of the total responses) were grouped by similarity of topic and categories identified. Responses and categories were given to a second researcher for classification of responses. Inter-rater agreement was 93%. The topic categories were further reduced for parsimony. Content categories were grouped according to the following five major themes: relationships, home life, threats to well being, social influences/peer pressures, and miscellaneous. Threats to well being was the category into which 91% of the responses could be classified. Topics in this category included abuse, neglect, health concerns, personal/emotional problems, depression, and parental discipline/punishment. Implications for nurses employed in any setting which focuses on children include assessing children for risk of exposure to violence abuse (self, domestic, school, community); personal/emotional problems; neglect; risk taking behavior related to social influences/peer pressures; and problems related to family, school, and peers.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:35:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:35:19Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.