2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165865
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women abuse survivors: Transitions to self-reinforcement
Author(s):
Hall, Joanne
Author Details:
Joanne Hall, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Tennessee School of Nursing, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA, email: jhall7@utk.edu
Abstract:
This research consisted of a secondary analysis of narratives of women survivors of childhood abuse, who also had substance misuse problems, using a research team approach. Narratives were collected in one to three 2-hour open-ended interviews. Themes were sought having to do with evidences of and factors involved in mental health risks, as well as resilience or "thriving" among a combined database of 55 women interviewed in two studies. All were low income and more than 75% in each study were women of color. Primarily drug abuse consisted of crack cocaine use. The women were self-selected for the study based on flyers asking if they had been abused or neglected as children and were currently in recovery from substance use for at least six months. Initial analyses of the data included relationships between patterns of interpersonal violence and substance use, problems with education and work, mother-daughter relationships and core narrative themes established early in life. These have been reported elsewhere. The framework for the entire study is the middle range theory of marginalization. That is, abuse, addiction and other factors peripheralize these women in reference to the dominant culture in terms of self-image, experience, relationships, economics and political factors. The current analysis focuses on sources and strategies women use to survive and even thrive; marginalization not only produces risks, but also stimulates and necessitates resilience. Findings of the analysis included that women reach transitional points in their recovery/survival at which they have epiphanies about themselves, expressed in stories and symbolically. These stories point to definite changes they make in their experience of self and the world around them. The transitions often involve making decisions more consciously and autonomously, seeking self-pleasures, claiming environmental space, realizing what is normative in terms of relationships with friends and partners, seeing options, leaving abusive adulthood partnerships, and realizing they have the same prerogatives as do others who have not had their difficult histories. Conditions that are antecedent to these epiphanic experiences are explored. Implications for nursing interventions and changes in extant mental health and substance abuse treatment practices are recommended.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen abuse survivors: Transitions to self-reinforcementen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHall, Joanneen_US
dc.author.detailsJoanne Hall, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Tennessee School of Nursing, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA, email: jhall7@utk.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165865-
dc.description.abstractThis research consisted of a secondary analysis of narratives of women survivors of childhood abuse, who also had substance misuse problems, using a research team approach. Narratives were collected in one to three 2-hour open-ended interviews. Themes were sought having to do with evidences of and factors involved in mental health risks, as well as resilience or "thriving" among a combined database of 55 women interviewed in two studies. All were low income and more than 75% in each study were women of color. Primarily drug abuse consisted of crack cocaine use. The women were self-selected for the study based on flyers asking if they had been abused or neglected as children and were currently in recovery from substance use for at least six months. Initial analyses of the data included relationships between patterns of interpersonal violence and substance use, problems with education and work, mother-daughter relationships and core narrative themes established early in life. These have been reported elsewhere. The framework for the entire study is the middle range theory of marginalization. That is, abuse, addiction and other factors peripheralize these women in reference to the dominant culture in terms of self-image, experience, relationships, economics and political factors. The current analysis focuses on sources and strategies women use to survive and even thrive; marginalization not only produces risks, but also stimulates and necessitates resilience. Findings of the analysis included that women reach transitional points in their recovery/survival at which they have epiphanies about themselves, expressed in stories and symbolically. These stories point to definite changes they make in their experience of self and the world around them. The transitions often involve making decisions more consciously and autonomously, seeking self-pleasures, claiming environmental space, realizing what is normative in terms of relationships with friends and partners, seeing options, leaving abusive adulthood partnerships, and realizing they have the same prerogatives as do others who have not had their difficult histories. Conditions that are antecedent to these epiphanic experiences are explored. Implications for nursing interventions and changes in extant mental health and substance abuse treatment practices are recommended.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:35:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:35:20Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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