2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165869
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Recruitment And Retention Issues In Research With Women And Minorities
Author(s):
Murdaugh, Carolyn
Author Details:
Carolyn Murdaugh, PhD, Director of Clinical Research, University of South Carolina College of Nursing, Columbia, South Carolina, USA, (updated as of February 2015) email: carolyn5@email.arizona.edu
Abstract:
The largest increase in population in the foreseeable future will be among groups with varying racial and ethnic backgrounds. Racial and ethnic minorities differ from each other and the white majority in social, political and economic history, socioeconomic status, extent of acculturation and cultural norms. The diversity in cultural and socioeconomic status and the heterogeneity among and within ethnic and racial populations must be recognized and taken into consideration when conducting research. Lack of attention to group differences results in failure to recruit and retain subjects in research as well as failure to investigate problems and offer interventions to health problems facing a large segment of the population. The purpose of this paper is to describe recruitment issues and strategies when conducting clinical research with women and minorities. First barriers to recruitment of women and minorities will be reviewed, as evidence indicates that persons who are more likely to participate in clinical research are white, above average in intelligence, better educated, have a higher socioeconomic status, and are less likely to be divorced or separated. Women who are younger, better educated, married, have a higher socioeconomic status and a family history of a given disease are also more likely to participate. Next, planning for recruitment of ethnic minorities will be outlined. Planning is key and must begin early when the study is being designed. Basic tenets that need to be addressed in the planning stage will be described. Last, recruitment strategies will be suggested, both individual strategies which address the individual as the primary unit or source of information, and community strategies which focus on recruiting the community as a whole. Recruitment strategies differ according to the unique needs of a particular population and stage of recruitment. However successful strategies that are applicable across studies have been identified. Lessons learned in prior clinical trials will be described to provide a base on which to build successful recruitment and retention techniques specific to women and minorities. Although recruitment and retention activities are multifaceted, complex, often costly, and time consuming, careful attention to recruitment issues is crucial for inclusion of adequate numbers of previously under-represented women and minorities.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRecruitment And Retention Issues In Research With Women And Minoritiesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMurdaugh, Carolynen_US
dc.author.detailsCarolyn Murdaugh, PhD, Director of Clinical Research, University of South Carolina College of Nursing, Columbia, South Carolina, USA, (updated as of February 2015) email: carolyn5@email.arizona.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165869-
dc.description.abstractThe largest increase in population in the foreseeable future will be among groups with varying racial and ethnic backgrounds. Racial and ethnic minorities differ from each other and the white majority in social, political and economic history, socioeconomic status, extent of acculturation and cultural norms. The diversity in cultural and socioeconomic status and the heterogeneity among and within ethnic and racial populations must be recognized and taken into consideration when conducting research. Lack of attention to group differences results in failure to recruit and retain subjects in research as well as failure to investigate problems and offer interventions to health problems facing a large segment of the population. The purpose of this paper is to describe recruitment issues and strategies when conducting clinical research with women and minorities. First barriers to recruitment of women and minorities will be reviewed, as evidence indicates that persons who are more likely to participate in clinical research are white, above average in intelligence, better educated, have a higher socioeconomic status, and are less likely to be divorced or separated. Women who are younger, better educated, married, have a higher socioeconomic status and a family history of a given disease are also more likely to participate. Next, planning for recruitment of ethnic minorities will be outlined. Planning is key and must begin early when the study is being designed. Basic tenets that need to be addressed in the planning stage will be described. Last, recruitment strategies will be suggested, both individual strategies which address the individual as the primary unit or source of information, and community strategies which focus on recruiting the community as a whole. Recruitment strategies differ according to the unique needs of a particular population and stage of recruitment. However successful strategies that are applicable across studies have been identified. Lessons learned in prior clinical trials will be described to provide a base on which to build successful recruitment and retention techniques specific to women and minorities. Although recruitment and retention activities are multifaceted, complex, often costly, and time consuming, careful attention to recruitment issues is crucial for inclusion of adequate numbers of previously under-represented women and minorities.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:35:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:35:25Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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