Individual And Community-based Interventions For Health Promotion In Minority Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165870
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Individual And Community-based Interventions For Health Promotion In Minority Women
Author(s):
Fleury, Julie
Author Details:
Julie Fleury, PhD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: jfleury@email.unc.edu
Abstract:
Attempts to explain why some women engage in health-promoting behaviors and why others do not have increased our understanding of the influence of individual attitudinal and cognitive variables such as the perceived benefits of behavior and self-efficacy. Existing behavioral models and programs of research have contributed to the creation of effective interventions for health promotion. However, the knowledge that these models account for little of the variance in health promotion for minority women must direct further investigation. For many women, health promotion efforts cannot be separated from that of their parents, children, extended family or friends. Thus, interventions designed to promote health in minority women must encompass both individual needs and the relationship between women and their environment. The primary focus in health promotion efforts has been at the individual level, treating those identified as at risk for illness, rather than focusing on health promotion within the community. To be effective, health promotion efforts must move beyond an individual focus to include an examination of community, social, cultural and contextual factors which place individuals and communities at risk for illness and which may be modified within health promotion efforts. The purpose of this paper is to summarize and critique existing research on individual and community-based interventions for health promotion in minority women. Individual-level and community-based models for health promotion will be reviewed, with strengths and weaknesses of the models outlined. A particular emphasis will be on the cultural and contextual relevance of health promotion research to minority women. The presentation will summarize directions for future research and intervention related to health promotion in minority women.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIndividual And Community-based Interventions For Health Promotion In Minority Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFleury, Julieen_US
dc.author.detailsJulie Fleury, PhD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: jfleury@email.unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165870-
dc.description.abstractAttempts to explain why some women engage in health-promoting behaviors and why others do not have increased our understanding of the influence of individual attitudinal and cognitive variables such as the perceived benefits of behavior and self-efficacy. Existing behavioral models and programs of research have contributed to the creation of effective interventions for health promotion. However, the knowledge that these models account for little of the variance in health promotion for minority women must direct further investigation. For many women, health promotion efforts cannot be separated from that of their parents, children, extended family or friends. Thus, interventions designed to promote health in minority women must encompass both individual needs and the relationship between women and their environment. The primary focus in health promotion efforts has been at the individual level, treating those identified as at risk for illness, rather than focusing on health promotion within the community. To be effective, health promotion efforts must move beyond an individual focus to include an examination of community, social, cultural and contextual factors which place individuals and communities at risk for illness and which may be modified within health promotion efforts. The purpose of this paper is to summarize and critique existing research on individual and community-based interventions for health promotion in minority women. Individual-level and community-based models for health promotion will be reviewed, with strengths and weaknesses of the models outlined. A particular emphasis will be on the cultural and contextual relevance of health promotion research to minority women. The presentation will summarize directions for future research and intervention related to health promotion in minority women.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:35:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:35:27Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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