2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165875
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SF-36 To Identify Rural Elderly At Risk For Hospitalization
Author(s):
Benjamin-Coleman, Richardean
Author Details:
Richardean Benjamin-Coleman, PhD, Old Dominion University School of Nursing, Norfolk, Virginia, USA, email: rcoleman@odu.edu
Abstract:
The SF-36 has been identified as a generic measure of health-related quality of life outcomes which is not age, disease or treatment specific and is deemed appropriate for monitoring the results of care as well as a measure of outcomes from the patient's perspective. The purpose of this study was to use the SF-36 to assess the general health status and health promotion activity of a sample of rural elderly one year following a community-based health promotion project. Eighty participants from the original sample of 222 (190 community-based and 32 home-based) residents were contacted by telephone and the SF-36 administered. The sample was 76.9% female, 59% white with a mean age of 73.6 years and a range of 58 - 99 years. Thirty percent of the sample had completed 12 years of education. The following research questions were addressed in this study: 1. Can the SF-36 be used to predict hospitalization? 2. Is there a relationship between SF-36 subscale scores and hospital admission? Results found that the general health subscale of the SF-36 accounted for almost 50% of the variance associated with past hospitalization. Additionally, using discriminant analysis, 77% of the study participants were correctly predicted for past hospitalization. Use of this instrument by health care providers can be helpful in identifying elderly at risk for hospitalization.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSF-36 To Identify Rural Elderly At Risk For Hospitalizationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBenjamin-Coleman, Richardeanen_US
dc.author.detailsRichardean Benjamin-Coleman, PhD, Old Dominion University School of Nursing, Norfolk, Virginia, USA, email: rcoleman@odu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165875-
dc.description.abstractThe SF-36 has been identified as a generic measure of health-related quality of life outcomes which is not age, disease or treatment specific and is deemed appropriate for monitoring the results of care as well as a measure of outcomes from the patient's perspective. The purpose of this study was to use the SF-36 to assess the general health status and health promotion activity of a sample of rural elderly one year following a community-based health promotion project. Eighty participants from the original sample of 222 (190 community-based and 32 home-based) residents were contacted by telephone and the SF-36 administered. The sample was 76.9% female, 59% white with a mean age of 73.6 years and a range of 58 - 99 years. Thirty percent of the sample had completed 12 years of education. The following research questions were addressed in this study: 1. Can the SF-36 be used to predict hospitalization? 2. Is there a relationship between SF-36 subscale scores and hospital admission? Results found that the general health subscale of the SF-36 accounted for almost 50% of the variance associated with past hospitalization. Additionally, using discriminant analysis, 77% of the study participants were correctly predicted for past hospitalization. Use of this instrument by health care providers can be helpful in identifying elderly at risk for hospitalization.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:35:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:35:33Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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