2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165876
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Caregiving In Rural African American Families For Elderly Stroke Survivors
Author(s):
Eaves, Yvonne
Author Details:
Yvonne Eaves, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: eaves@email.unc.edu
Abstract:
In recent years the literature on ethnic caregivers has grown, yet, it remains significantly small in comparison to the body of research on Caucasian caregivers. The overall purpose of this grounded theory study was to examine the process of caregiving from the perspective of African American families living in rural settings who were caring for a family member who had suffered a recent stroke. Another aim of the study was to generate a substantive theory to explain the impact caregiving had on the lives of rural African Americans. Semi-structured interviews and participant observation sessions were conducted with eight African American families consisting of eight stroke survivors, eight primary caregivers, and 18 secondary caregivers. Grounded theory method was used to collect and analyze the data. A multi-step data analysis technique that incorporated the constant comparative method was used to uncover basic social processes, core categories, and their dimensions. The collection and comparative analysis of the data occurred simultaneously over a period of 14 months. The findings revealed the basic social psychological problem of transitions, and a four stage basic social process of striking a balance. These four stages included: Stage I--Deciding to Care, Stage II--Dividing Care, Stage III--Protective Care, and Stage IV--Coming to Terms. Stage I strategies included: (a) being obligated, (b) giving back, and (c) attaching personal meaning. Stage II strategies included: (a) sharing care, (b) venting dissatisfaction with help, (c) recognizing need for more help, and (c) knocking down. Stage III strategies included: (a) covering up, (b) conferring, and (c) negotiating. Stage IV strategies include: (a) struggling for independence, (b) coping with changed roles, and (c) relinquishing care. This study has implications for both nursing practice and nursing research. First, The substantive theory of caregiving developed in this study provides a guide for nurses in determining appropriate interventions for rural African American families caring for a stroke survivor. This study provides a basis for future research and theory that may lead to a formal theory of caregiving in African Americans using the substantive theory of Caregiving in Rural African Americans, as a foundation.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCaregiving In Rural African American Families For Elderly Stroke Survivorsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEaves, Yvonneen_US
dc.author.detailsYvonne Eaves, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: eaves@email.unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165876-
dc.description.abstractIn recent years the literature on ethnic caregivers has grown, yet, it remains significantly small in comparison to the body of research on Caucasian caregivers. The overall purpose of this grounded theory study was to examine the process of caregiving from the perspective of African American families living in rural settings who were caring for a family member who had suffered a recent stroke. Another aim of the study was to generate a substantive theory to explain the impact caregiving had on the lives of rural African Americans. Semi-structured interviews and participant observation sessions were conducted with eight African American families consisting of eight stroke survivors, eight primary caregivers, and 18 secondary caregivers. Grounded theory method was used to collect and analyze the data. A multi-step data analysis technique that incorporated the constant comparative method was used to uncover basic social processes, core categories, and their dimensions. The collection and comparative analysis of the data occurred simultaneously over a period of 14 months. The findings revealed the basic social psychological problem of transitions, and a four stage basic social process of striking a balance. These four stages included: Stage I--Deciding to Care, Stage II--Dividing Care, Stage III--Protective Care, and Stage IV--Coming to Terms. Stage I strategies included: (a) being obligated, (b) giving back, and (c) attaching personal meaning. Stage II strategies included: (a) sharing care, (b) venting dissatisfaction with help, (c) recognizing need for more help, and (c) knocking down. Stage III strategies included: (a) covering up, (b) conferring, and (c) negotiating. Stage IV strategies include: (a) struggling for independence, (b) coping with changed roles, and (c) relinquishing care. This study has implications for both nursing practice and nursing research. First, The substantive theory of caregiving developed in this study provides a guide for nurses in determining appropriate interventions for rural African American families caring for a stroke survivor. This study provides a basis for future research and theory that may lead to a formal theory of caregiving in African Americans using the substantive theory of Caregiving in Rural African Americans, as a foundation.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:35:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:35:34Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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