Hot Flashes Following Breast Cancer Treatment: Prevalence, Severity, Predictors, And Management

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165880
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hot Flashes Following Breast Cancer Treatment: Prevalence, Severity, Predictors, And Management
Author(s):
Carpenter, Janet
Author Details:
Janet Carpenter, PhD, Assistant Professor, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: janet.s.carpenter@vanderbilt.edu
Abstract:
Symptom management is an integral component of breast cancer (BC) care and a key aspect of quality of life (QOL). Although attention to cancer treatment side effects has increased in recent years, research on menopausal symptoms, such as hot flashes (HFs), in women post treatment for BC remains scarce. Among women with BC, HFs can be exacerbated due to side effects of chemotherapy and Tamoxifen and treatment of HFs is complicated because hormone replacement therapy is controversial at best, and generally contraindicated. The purposes of this cross-sectional study were to (a) determine the prevalence and severity of HFs in postmenopausal outpatients previously treated for BC, (b) describe predictors of HF prevalence and severity in this sample, and (c) examine women's use and knowledge of HF symptom management strategies. The sample consisted of 115 postmenopausal women with BC who were a mean age of 58.8 years old (SD = 10.3) and 34.8 months (SD = 22.1) post completion of primary treatment (surgery, radiation, chemotherapy). Results confirmed the notion that HFs represent a significant symptom management problem among women with BC. HF prevalence and severity: Among the 65% of women reporting HFs, 59% reported severity as "quite a bit" to "extremely" severe. In addition, 23% reported being extremely bothered by their HFs (rating of 10 on a 0 to 10 point numeric rating scale). Predictors of HF prevalence and severity were examined using logistic and multiple regression analyses. Variables included in the regression models included demographic information, BC specific information (type of treatments received, time post treatment), menstrual history, and lifestyle factors (bodymass, smoking, use of alcohol). Results from the regression analyses will be discussed in relation to identification of women at risk (a) for experiencing HFs and (b) for experiencing severe HFs. HF management: At time of interview, 37% of women with HFs were not using any strategies to manage their symptoms and 63% desired more information regarding HF management. Strategies that were used by women at time of interview included non-hormonal medications, vitamins, diet, exercise, and behavioral methods, such as relaxation. Discussion will focus on (a) the problem of HF symptom management in women with BC and (b) recommendations for exploring the efficacy of non-hormonal interventions in future research designed to decrease HFs and improve QOL.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHot Flashes Following Breast Cancer Treatment: Prevalence, Severity, Predictors, And Managementen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarpenter, Janeten_US
dc.author.detailsJanet Carpenter, PhD, Assistant Professor, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: janet.s.carpenter@vanderbilt.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165880-
dc.description.abstractSymptom management is an integral component of breast cancer (BC) care and a key aspect of quality of life (QOL). Although attention to cancer treatment side effects has increased in recent years, research on menopausal symptoms, such as hot flashes (HFs), in women post treatment for BC remains scarce. Among women with BC, HFs can be exacerbated due to side effects of chemotherapy and Tamoxifen and treatment of HFs is complicated because hormone replacement therapy is controversial at best, and generally contraindicated. The purposes of this cross-sectional study were to (a) determine the prevalence and severity of HFs in postmenopausal outpatients previously treated for BC, (b) describe predictors of HF prevalence and severity in this sample, and (c) examine women's use and knowledge of HF symptom management strategies. The sample consisted of 115 postmenopausal women with BC who were a mean age of 58.8 years old (SD = 10.3) and 34.8 months (SD = 22.1) post completion of primary treatment (surgery, radiation, chemotherapy). Results confirmed the notion that HFs represent a significant symptom management problem among women with BC. HF prevalence and severity: Among the 65% of women reporting HFs, 59% reported severity as "quite a bit" to "extremely" severe. In addition, 23% reported being extremely bothered by their HFs (rating of 10 on a 0 to 10 point numeric rating scale). Predictors of HF prevalence and severity were examined using logistic and multiple regression analyses. Variables included in the regression models included demographic information, BC specific information (type of treatments received, time post treatment), menstrual history, and lifestyle factors (bodymass, smoking, use of alcohol). Results from the regression analyses will be discussed in relation to identification of women at risk (a) for experiencing HFs and (b) for experiencing severe HFs. HF management: At time of interview, 37% of women with HFs were not using any strategies to manage their symptoms and 63% desired more information regarding HF management. Strategies that were used by women at time of interview included non-hormonal medications, vitamins, diet, exercise, and behavioral methods, such as relaxation. Discussion will focus on (a) the problem of HF symptom management in women with BC and (b) recommendations for exploring the efficacy of non-hormonal interventions in future research designed to decrease HFs and improve QOL.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:35:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:35:39Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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