2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165886
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship Between Social Support And Infant Birthweight
Author(s):
Corbett, Robin
Author Details:
Robin Corbett, PhD, East Carolina University School of Nursing, Greensville, North Carolina, USA, email: corbettr@mail.ecu.edu
Abstract:
Infant mortality is a significant health care problem in the United States, especially in the southeastern region. The primary determinant of infant mortality is low birthweight. Infants of African-American women, specifically rural socioeconomically disadvantaged women, are at particular risk. This study examined the relationship of social support to infant birthweight among socioeconomically disadvantaged pregnant women in context of the Roy Adaptation Model. The research hypothesis was there is a positive correlation between social support and infant birthweight. The sample was composed of 128 socioeconomically disadvantaged women receiving prenatal care from two rural community health agencies. This study was a comparative correlational investigation. Demographic and sociocultural data were collected. The survey tool, Brown's Support Behaviors Inventory, was administered during the prenatal clinic visits. Descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, Person product-moment correlation, ANOVAs and stepwise multiple regression were used to analyze the data. Statistical analysis controlled for ethnicity. The majority of the sample were single, African-American women, two demographic characteristics significantly related to lower infant birthweight. A statistically significant predictor of increased infant birthweight was Combined Social Support (Family/Friends and Partners). Controlling statistically for ethnicity, increases in Partner Social Support or Combined Social Support were significantly associated with increased infant birthweight. This research supports the multifaceted nature of infant mortality. Implications for future research include investigation of the relationship of specific social support interventions to infant birthweight, the determination of what behaviors constitute social support; partner, family/friends and nursing as identified by the pregnant patient, and examination of the relationship of household structure to infant birthweight.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship Between Social Support And Infant Birthweighten_GB
dc.contributor.authorCorbett, Robinen_US
dc.author.detailsRobin Corbett, PhD, East Carolina University School of Nursing, Greensville, North Carolina, USA, email: corbettr@mail.ecu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165886-
dc.description.abstractInfant mortality is a significant health care problem in the United States, especially in the southeastern region. The primary determinant of infant mortality is low birthweight. Infants of African-American women, specifically rural socioeconomically disadvantaged women, are at particular risk. This study examined the relationship of social support to infant birthweight among socioeconomically disadvantaged pregnant women in context of the Roy Adaptation Model. The research hypothesis was there is a positive correlation between social support and infant birthweight. The sample was composed of 128 socioeconomically disadvantaged women receiving prenatal care from two rural community health agencies. This study was a comparative correlational investigation. Demographic and sociocultural data were collected. The survey tool, Brown's Support Behaviors Inventory, was administered during the prenatal clinic visits. Descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, Person product-moment correlation, ANOVAs and stepwise multiple regression were used to analyze the data. Statistical analysis controlled for ethnicity. The majority of the sample were single, African-American women, two demographic characteristics significantly related to lower infant birthweight. A statistically significant predictor of increased infant birthweight was Combined Social Support (Family/Friends and Partners). Controlling statistically for ethnicity, increases in Partner Social Support or Combined Social Support were significantly associated with increased infant birthweight. This research supports the multifaceted nature of infant mortality. Implications for future research include investigation of the relationship of specific social support interventions to infant birthweight, the determination of what behaviors constitute social support; partner, family/friends and nursing as identified by the pregnant patient, and examination of the relationship of household structure to infant birthweight.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:35:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:35:47Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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