2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165888
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Home Health Care And Pregnancy Outcomes In High Risk Antepartum Patients
Author(s):
Hart, Marcella
Author Details:
Marcella Hart, PhD, Professor, Armstrong Atlantic State University, Department of Nursing, Savannah, Georgia, USA, email: hartmarc@mail.armstrong.edu
Abstract:
High risk pregnancies such as those with preterm labor, diabetes, and pregnancy induced hypertension, often result in antepartum hospitalizations for mothers who are compromised and prolonged neonatal hospitalizations for the infant. Both hospitalizations are costly for the families and health care system Health care delivery today has mandated the change from hospital to home care as a way to reduce costs. However, disagreement exists within the medical and health care community about the efficiency of managing the high risk antepartum patients in the home. A two-year retrospective chart review was completed to analyze the outcomes and costs of care for a group of high risk pregnant women using a home health care regimen. Fifty-four charts from a home health agency serving mostly rural counties (n = 43, 80%) were analyzed. The majority were enrolled in the preterm labor program (n = 47, 90%) including seven sets of tww5. The women in the preterm labor program were managed using home uterine monitoring and/or terbutaline pumps along with daily telephone consultation. Results showed an average infant birth weight of 2785 grams with the median gestational age at delivery of 37 weeks gestation. The average time in the home health service was 63 days. Cost per day for hospital care of the preterm labor patient is approximately $900.00; the average cost here would have been $56,700.00. The average cost per day for home care is $300.00; the average total cost for a patient in this group was $18,900.00. An average cost saving of $37,800 was achieved per patient. This study shows that the use of a perinatal home health agency with experienced perinatal nurses can lead to cost-effective care and healthy delivery outcomes for the high risk pregnant patients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHome Health Care And Pregnancy Outcomes In High Risk Antepartum Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHart, Marcellaen_US
dc.author.detailsMarcella Hart, PhD, Professor, Armstrong Atlantic State University, Department of Nursing, Savannah, Georgia, USA, email: hartmarc@mail.armstrong.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165888-
dc.description.abstractHigh risk pregnancies such as those with preterm labor, diabetes, and pregnancy induced hypertension, often result in antepartum hospitalizations for mothers who are compromised and prolonged neonatal hospitalizations for the infant. Both hospitalizations are costly for the families and health care system Health care delivery today has mandated the change from hospital to home care as a way to reduce costs. However, disagreement exists within the medical and health care community about the efficiency of managing the high risk antepartum patients in the home. A two-year retrospective chart review was completed to analyze the outcomes and costs of care for a group of high risk pregnant women using a home health care regimen. Fifty-four charts from a home health agency serving mostly rural counties (n = 43, 80%) were analyzed. The majority were enrolled in the preterm labor program (n = 47, 90%) including seven sets of tww5. The women in the preterm labor program were managed using home uterine monitoring and/or terbutaline pumps along with daily telephone consultation. Results showed an average infant birth weight of 2785 grams with the median gestational age at delivery of 37 weeks gestation. The average time in the home health service was 63 days. Cost per day for hospital care of the preterm labor patient is approximately $900.00; the average cost here would have been $56,700.00. The average cost per day for home care is $300.00; the average total cost for a patient in this group was $18,900.00. An average cost saving of $37,800 was achieved per patient. This study shows that the use of a perinatal home health agency with experienced perinatal nurses can lead to cost-effective care and healthy delivery outcomes for the high risk pregnant patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:35:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:35:49Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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