2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165889
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Is The Demand For Nurses Really Declining?
Author(s):
Cleary, Brenda
Author Details:
Brenda Cleary, PhD, North Carolina Center for Nursing, Raliegh, North Carolina, USA, (updated February 2015) email: bcleary@ga.unc.edu
Abstract:
During May 1996, the North Carolina Center for Nursing surveyed all hospitals and a geographically stratified random sample of other nurse employers in North Carolina to obtain information about the current and future labor market for nursing personnel. The 1996 Nurse Employer Survey addressed the following questions: * What organizational changes are anticipated over the next two years that will effect the overall demand for nurses? * What is the anticipated need for nurses with different levels of education? * What types of nurses are currently in short supply, and where? * What specific skills/competencies are desired by employers? An overall response rate of 78.2% resulted in 667 completed telephone interviews with persons responsible for nurse staffing and resource planning in 112 hospitals and 555 other health care agencies. The sample design was stratified geographically to produce statistically reliable estimates for three regions across the state. A telephone interview format was used to ensure equitable and adequate response rates, and to derive a richer understanding of employer perceptions than is possible in a mail survey. The survey instrument was developed by Center for Nursing staff in collaboration with outside advisors. Descriptive and correlational statistics were used to analyze the data. Survey results indicate that there is an increasing demand for unlicensed assistive personnel, as well as for BSN-prepared registered nurses, nurse practitioners, nurse midwives, clinical nurse specialists, and nurses with Master's preparation in administration. The demand for LPNs and associate degree or diploma-prepared RNs appears to be declining in hospitals but shifting into community settings. State level and regional level data will be presented in table and graphic formats. A correlation analysis was used to determine if increased demand for one type of nursing personnel is associated with a decrease in demand for other types. Results show no systematic substitution of one type for another. The information contained in this presentation will be useful to nurse researchers interested in health services research, nurse administrators, nurse educators, and policy makers. We believe this short term forecast of what nurse employers expect the employment market for nurses will look like in North Carolina is also reflective of other states, particularly those with mixed managed care saturation. Strategic planning for nurse staffing is integrally related to achieving quality outcomes at a reasonable cost.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIs The Demand For Nurses Really Declining?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorCleary, Brendaen_US
dc.author.detailsBrenda Cleary, PhD, North Carolina Center for Nursing, Raliegh, North Carolina, USA, (updated February 2015) email: bcleary@ga.unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165889-
dc.description.abstractDuring May 1996, the North Carolina Center for Nursing surveyed all hospitals and a geographically stratified random sample of other nurse employers in North Carolina to obtain information about the current and future labor market for nursing personnel. The 1996 Nurse Employer Survey addressed the following questions: * What organizational changes are anticipated over the next two years that will effect the overall demand for nurses? * What is the anticipated need for nurses with different levels of education? * What types of nurses are currently in short supply, and where? * What specific skills/competencies are desired by employers? An overall response rate of 78.2% resulted in 667 completed telephone interviews with persons responsible for nurse staffing and resource planning in 112 hospitals and 555 other health care agencies. The sample design was stratified geographically to produce statistically reliable estimates for three regions across the state. A telephone interview format was used to ensure equitable and adequate response rates, and to derive a richer understanding of employer perceptions than is possible in a mail survey. The survey instrument was developed by Center for Nursing staff in collaboration with outside advisors. Descriptive and correlational statistics were used to analyze the data. Survey results indicate that there is an increasing demand for unlicensed assistive personnel, as well as for BSN-prepared registered nurses, nurse practitioners, nurse midwives, clinical nurse specialists, and nurses with Master's preparation in administration. The demand for LPNs and associate degree or diploma-prepared RNs appears to be declining in hospitals but shifting into community settings. State level and regional level data will be presented in table and graphic formats. A correlation analysis was used to determine if increased demand for one type of nursing personnel is associated with a decrease in demand for other types. Results show no systematic substitution of one type for another. The information contained in this presentation will be useful to nurse researchers interested in health services research, nurse administrators, nurse educators, and policy makers. We believe this short term forecast of what nurse employers expect the employment market for nurses will look like in North Carolina is also reflective of other states, particularly those with mixed managed care saturation. Strategic planning for nurse staffing is integrally related to achieving quality outcomes at a reasonable cost.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:35:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:35:51Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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