2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165891
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Classification Schemes For Nursing Language
Author(s):
Tillman, Harry
Author Details:
Harry Tillman, PhD, Commander, Nurse Corps, U.S. Navy, Head, Nursing Research, Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, Portsmouth, Virginia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: tillmahj@evms.edu
Abstract:
The study was designed to examine the availability of the Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS) elements in acute care medical patient records and to determine how reliably the nursing care elements of nursing diagnosis and nursing intervention could be translated and coded according to the North American Nursing Diagnosis association (NANDA) taxonomy and the Nursing Intervention Classification (NIC). Furthermore data that could not fit these language systems were examined for patterns that suggested additions or revisions to these two classifications schemes. This descriptive, ethnomethodologic field study used content analysis as an investigative strategy within an interpretive research design to examine 92 randomly selected medical patient records from a large, urban university medical center located in a Mid-Atlantic state. These records were from a non-computerized record system, and all text abstraction was from narrative nursing notes and flow sheets. There were 686 text phrases captured in this study describing nursing diagnoses, of which 508 (74%) could be coded according to the NANDA taxonomy. Eleven diagnosis categories emerged from the remaining test phrases, nine of which may be potential concepts consistent with the NANDA schema. These concepts were: nausea, vomiting, itching, bleeding, coordination/equilibrium, laboratory data, blood pressure changes, coughing, and seizure. A total of 34,230 nursing intervention text phrases were abstracted and 88 percent (30, 117) of these were able to be coded according to the NIC. Twenty-seven categories emerged from the remaining text phrases that may suggest additional intervention classification work to be done. The intervention categories most consistent with the NlC framework are: informed consent, pulse oximetry, telemetry, orthostatic tilt blood pressure measurements, and several issues dealing with expanding the coding for "routes" of medication administration. Adjustments to the NMDS data collection instrument are discussed including Unique Facility Number, the Unique Number of the Principal Registered Nurse, and the Race/Ethnicity elements. Implication f for improving the exclusivity of the NANDA and NlC labels are discussed. Current diagnostic and intervention labels that could be expanded to be more inclusive of the "natural language" of the generalist registered nurse are discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleClassification Schemes For Nursing Languageen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTillman, Harryen_US
dc.author.detailsHarry Tillman, PhD, Commander, Nurse Corps, U.S. Navy, Head, Nursing Research, Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, Portsmouth, Virginia, USA, (updated February 2015) email: tillmahj@evms.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165891-
dc.description.abstractThe study was designed to examine the availability of the Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS) elements in acute care medical patient records and to determine how reliably the nursing care elements of nursing diagnosis and nursing intervention could be translated and coded according to the North American Nursing Diagnosis association (NANDA) taxonomy and the Nursing Intervention Classification (NIC). Furthermore data that could not fit these language systems were examined for patterns that suggested additions or revisions to these two classifications schemes. This descriptive, ethnomethodologic field study used content analysis as an investigative strategy within an interpretive research design to examine 92 randomly selected medical patient records from a large, urban university medical center located in a Mid-Atlantic state. These records were from a non-computerized record system, and all text abstraction was from narrative nursing notes and flow sheets. There were 686 text phrases captured in this study describing nursing diagnoses, of which 508 (74%) could be coded according to the NANDA taxonomy. Eleven diagnosis categories emerged from the remaining test phrases, nine of which may be potential concepts consistent with the NANDA schema. These concepts were: nausea, vomiting, itching, bleeding, coordination/equilibrium, laboratory data, blood pressure changes, coughing, and seizure. A total of 34,230 nursing intervention text phrases were abstracted and 88 percent (30, 117) of these were able to be coded according to the NIC. Twenty-seven categories emerged from the remaining text phrases that may suggest additional intervention classification work to be done. The intervention categories most consistent with the NlC framework are: informed consent, pulse oximetry, telemetry, orthostatic tilt blood pressure measurements, and several issues dealing with expanding the coding for "routes" of medication administration. Adjustments to the NMDS data collection instrument are discussed including Unique Facility Number, the Unique Number of the Principal Registered Nurse, and the Race/Ethnicity elements. Implication f for improving the exclusivity of the NANDA and NlC labels are discussed. Current diagnostic and intervention labels that could be expanded to be more inclusive of the "natural language" of the generalist registered nurse are discussed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:35:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:35:53Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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