Collaborative Efforts To Reach Health Needs Of Underserved Populations: The Long Creek Migrant Health Project

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165895
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Collaborative Efforts To Reach Health Needs Of Underserved Populations: The Long Creek Migrant Health Project
Abstract:
Collaborative Efforts To Reach Health Needs Of Underserved Populations: The Long Creek Migrant Health Project
Conference Sponsor:Southern Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:1998
Conference Date:February 19-21, 1998
Author:Kline, Priscilla, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:Clemson University College of Nursing
Title:Associate Dean
Contact Address:309 Edwards Hall Box 341704, Clemson, SC, 29634-1704, USA
Contact Telephone:803.656.5498

Migrant farm workers assist in providing the nation with affordable food, often at the expense of their own health. Of the more than 3 million U.S. migrant workers, only an estimated 1/2 million are reached by Federally-funded Migrant Health clinics; yet these workers and their families are among the most vulnerable to health problems. Factors contributing to this vulnerability include: heavy labor over long hours, migration-related isolation, potential for work-related injury, sun, heat and chemical exposure, frequently deplorable housing conditions such as overcrowding and poor sanitation, nutritional deficiencies, and lack of knowledge or practice of preventive health measures. Barriers to health care include: lack of accessible clinics during non-working hours, overcrowding of potentially affordable clinics by local indigents, and lack of understanding by health care providers regarding their needs, beliefs, health practices, preferences and priorities due to language and cultural differences.

South Carolina estimates close to 15,000 migrant workers annually as part of the "eastern stream". Prior to 1991 no health care services were provided to the hundreds who picked apples in Oconee county, the most remote county in upstate South Carolina in the foothills of Appalachia. Following community interviews by Clemson University nursing faculty in 1990, a contract was developed between the J.F. Sullivan Center for Nursing and Wellness and the state Office of Rural Health's Migrant Health Program to initiate a nurse-managed clinic using a mobile health unit parked at a community center in Long Creek, approximately 35 miles from the university. Held during evening hours to accommodate workers, the clinic operates between late August and early October until the picking season ends. Initially operating with faculty and senior nursing students prior to nurses' prescriptive authority, the need arose for medical prescriptions while a paucity of physicians willing to participate prevailed. Currently the clinic operates with nurse practitioners and students, public health students, and Spanish students as translators.

Over the past six years the clinic has served 234 clients for a total of 534 visits. A core group of "regulars" consists of black South Carolina residents from the lower part of the state who migrate through South Carolina and Florida with the crops. An increasing but varied group consists of Hispanics. Ages vary from infants to age 93, but average in the forties. Descriptive data reveal significant problems in terms of both specific health needs and health care delivery. Specific health problems identified include hypertension, tuberculosis, sexually transmitted diseases, nutritional problems, acute infections, skin disorders, alcohol consumption, and lack of preventive health care. Delivery problems identified relate to discontinuity of care, lack of follow-up care, lack of knowledge of prevention, and culturally varied health beliefs and practices.

Implications for extension of the project and ongoing research are strongly indicated by analysis of findings. Recommendations to be addressed include: continued study of specific health problems and trends for this population, directed efforts to address and remove barriers to continuity of care as migration occurs, increasing movement toward preventive rather than episodic care within the migrant network, further qualitative study of health beliefs and practices to foster understanding of client receptivity, and the testing of specific culturally-sensitive interventions while monitoring long-term responses and changes in health behaviors. Effects of the use of trained peer Camp Health Aides on changing health practices may also be examined.


Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
19-Feb-1998
Sponsors:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
Withdrawn - Lack of author information. Lack of critical metadata.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCollaborative Efforts To Reach Health Needs Of Underserved Populations: The Long Creek Migrant Health Projecten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165895-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Collaborative Efforts To Reach Health Needs Of Underserved Populations: The Long Creek Migrant Health Project</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Southern Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1998</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">February 19-21, 1998</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kline, Priscilla, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Clemson University College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">309 Edwards Hall Box 341704, Clemson, SC, 29634-1704, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">803.656.5498</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pkline@innova.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract"><br/>Migrant farm workers assist in providing the nation with affordable food, often at the expense of their own health. Of the more than 3 million U.S. migrant workers, only an estimated 1/2 million are reached by Federally-funded Migrant Health clinics; yet these workers and their families are among the most vulnerable to health problems. Factors contributing to this vulnerability include: heavy labor over long hours, migration-related isolation, potential for work-related injury, sun, heat and chemical exposure, frequently deplorable housing conditions such as overcrowding and poor sanitation, nutritional deficiencies, and lack of knowledge or practice of preventive health measures. Barriers to health care include: lack of accessible clinics during non-working hours, overcrowding of potentially affordable clinics by local indigents, and lack of understanding by health care providers regarding their needs, beliefs, health practices, preferences and priorities due to language and cultural differences.<br/><br/>South Carolina estimates close to 15,000 migrant workers annually as part of the "eastern stream". Prior to 1991 no health care services were provided to the hundreds who picked apples in Oconee county, the most remote county in upstate South Carolina in the foothills of Appalachia. Following community interviews by Clemson University nursing faculty in 1990, a contract was developed between the J.F. Sullivan Center for Nursing and Wellness and the state Office of Rural Health's Migrant Health Program to initiate a nurse-managed clinic using a mobile health unit parked at a community center in Long Creek, approximately 35 miles from the university. Held during evening hours to accommodate workers, the clinic operates between late August and early October until the picking season ends. Initially operating with faculty and senior nursing students prior to nurses' prescriptive authority, the need arose for medical prescriptions while a paucity of physicians willing to participate prevailed. Currently the clinic operates with nurse practitioners and students, public health students, and Spanish students as translators.<br/><br/>Over the past six years the clinic has served 234 clients for a total of 534 visits. A core group of "regulars" consists of black South Carolina residents from the lower part of the state who migrate through South Carolina and Florida with the crops. An increasing but varied group consists of Hispanics. Ages vary from infants to age 93, but average in the forties. Descriptive data reveal significant problems in terms of both specific health needs and health care delivery. Specific health problems identified include hypertension, tuberculosis, sexually transmitted diseases, nutritional problems, acute infections, skin disorders, alcohol consumption, and lack of preventive health care. Delivery problems identified relate to discontinuity of care, lack of follow-up care, lack of knowledge of prevention, and culturally varied health beliefs and practices.<br/><br/>Implications for extension of the project and ongoing research are strongly indicated by analysis of findings. Recommendations to be addressed include: continued study of specific health problems and trends for this population, directed efforts to address and remove barriers to continuity of care as migration occurs, increasing movement toward preventive rather than episodic care within the migrant network, further qualitative study of health beliefs and practices to foster understanding of client receptivity, and the testing of specific culturally-sensitive interventions while monitoring long-term responses and changes in health behaviors. Effects of the use of trained peer Camp Health Aides on changing health practices may also be examined.<br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:35:58Z-
dc.date.issued1998-02-19en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:35:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_GB
dc.description.noteWithdrawn - Lack of author information. Lack of critical metadata.-
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