2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165899
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Toward Culturally Sensitive Interventions With African American Mothers With HIV
Author(s):
Miles, Margaret
Author Details:
Margaret Miles, PhD, Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: mmiles@email.unc.edu
Abstract:
Low-income African American women are the fastest growing population being infected with the HIV virus. Interventions to help them cope with their diagnosis, understand HIV, and learn how to prevent and manage health problems within the context of HIV are important in their long-term prognosis. However, interventions must be developed that are sensitive to the unique cultural issues of these women. The Maternal Symptom Management model was developed based on interviews with African American women coping with HIV. As a result of these interviews, our observations with mothers in a previous related study, and our review of the literature we identified the high importance of the maternal role to these mothers, their tendency to put their children's needs as well as the needs of others before their own, and their concerns about staying well so they could see their children grow up. As a result, we designed the intervention so that the mothers' concerns about their children are used as an important motivating factor for taking care of their own health. In addition, extensive consultation was sought from African Americans to develop guidelines for approaching the mothers in a culturally sensitive manner. These guidelines include personalizing the intervention, empowering the mother, paying attention to the interpersonal aspects of the intervention, facilitating the telling of stories by the mother, and understanding the differing concept of time which may be experienced in working with the mothers. The MSM intervention is presently being tested with funding from NINR. Preliminary results of our experiences in using the culturally based intervention will be presented.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleToward Culturally Sensitive Interventions With African American Mothers With HIVen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMiles, Margareten_US
dc.author.detailsMargaret Miles, PhD, Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: mmiles@email.unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165899-
dc.description.abstractLow-income African American women are the fastest growing population being infected with the HIV virus. Interventions to help them cope with their diagnosis, understand HIV, and learn how to prevent and manage health problems within the context of HIV are important in their long-term prognosis. However, interventions must be developed that are sensitive to the unique cultural issues of these women. The Maternal Symptom Management model was developed based on interviews with African American women coping with HIV. As a result of these interviews, our observations with mothers in a previous related study, and our review of the literature we identified the high importance of the maternal role to these mothers, their tendency to put their children's needs as well as the needs of others before their own, and their concerns about staying well so they could see their children grow up. As a result, we designed the intervention so that the mothers' concerns about their children are used as an important motivating factor for taking care of their own health. In addition, extensive consultation was sought from African Americans to develop guidelines for approaching the mothers in a culturally sensitive manner. These guidelines include personalizing the intervention, empowering the mother, paying attention to the interpersonal aspects of the intervention, facilitating the telling of stories by the mother, and understanding the differing concept of time which may be experienced in working with the mothers. The MSM intervention is presently being tested with funding from NINR. Preliminary results of our experiences in using the culturally based intervention will be presented.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:36:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:36:03Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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