Challenges In Conducting Health Promotion Intervention Research With Sedentary African American And European American Women In The Community

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165901
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Challenges In Conducting Health Promotion Intervention Research With Sedentary African American And European American Women In The Community
Author(s):
Nies, Mary
Author Details:
Mary Nies, PhD, Associate Dean for Research, Wayne State University College of Nursing, Detroit, Michigan, USA, email: m.nies@wayne.edu
Abstract:
This presentation will discuss the challenges related to starting up an NIH NINR funded research study. Issues related to conducting intervention research with healthy women above and below the poverty level will be addressed. Healthy People 2000 states that light to moderate physical activity should occur regularly and at a minimum of 3 times per week, 30 minutes per day, to optimize health, yet many women continue inactive lifestyles. Research has shown that women have many varied responsibilities during the day which results in limited time for exercise. The goal of this study is to increase physical activity in African-American and European American women, particularly those who are low-income. Challenges that impact the implementation and participation in an intervention study for this population will be discussed. In addition, we will describe the experiences related to starting up a nursing intervention to increase physical activity in sedentary women in the community.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChallenges In Conducting Health Promotion Intervention Research With Sedentary African American And European American Women In The Communityen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNies, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Nies, PhD, Associate Dean for Research, Wayne State University College of Nursing, Detroit, Michigan, USA, email: m.nies@wayne.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165901-
dc.description.abstractThis presentation will discuss the challenges related to starting up an NIH NINR funded research study. Issues related to conducting intervention research with healthy women above and below the poverty level will be addressed. Healthy People 2000 states that light to moderate physical activity should occur regularly and at a minimum of 3 times per week, 30 minutes per day, to optimize health, yet many women continue inactive lifestyles. Research has shown that women have many varied responsibilities during the day which results in limited time for exercise. The goal of this study is to increase physical activity in African-American and European American women, particularly those who are low-income. Challenges that impact the implementation and participation in an intervention study for this population will be discussed. In addition, we will describe the experiences related to starting up a nursing intervention to increase physical activity in sedentary women in the community.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:36:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:36:06Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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