2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165905
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects Of Death Education On Nurses' Death Anxiety Levels
Author(s):
Waddell, Donna
Author Details:
Donna Waddell, EdD, Assistant Professor, North Georgia College and State University Department of Nursing, Dahlonega, Georgia, USA, email: dwaddell@nugget.ngc.peachnet.edu
Abstract:
For over two decades researchers have investigated the relationship between death education and nurses' death anxiety levels. The hypothesis tested was that death education reduced death anxiety levels and, therefore, improved nursing practice with terminally and critically ill patients. However, the results of these primary studies have been inconsistent. It is difficult to arrive at any compelling conclusions about the benefits of death education with a narrative review of the published research. Therefore, a meta-analysis of the published and unpublished research done to date was conducted to determine the extent to which death education decreases nurses' death anxiety levels and identify any mediating factors, such as demographics of the subjects, characteristics of the death education program, and circumstances under which death education programs are offered. The units of analysis were the primary research studies which met the following inclusion criteria: a) death education was implemented as a treatment, b) death anxiety was the dependent variable, c) subjects were registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs), or RN or LPN students, d) enough data was given to compute an effect size. The search for studies meeting these criteria was conducted for more than a year. Search methodologies included computer searches of CINAHL, MEDLINE, PSYCHLIT, and SSCI, Dissertation Abstracts International, and Masters Theses Abstracts International databases; ancestry; decendency; posting notices on the relevant internet bulletin boards; and formal and informal networking with researchers in the field of death education. The search is concluding at this time and 60 studies meeting the inclusion criteria have been located and coded. The array of studies span more than 20 years of research and is international in scope. Data analysis will include computing an effect size for each primary study, averaging the overall effect size, and, using nonparametric correlational procedures, conducting subanalyses for mediating effects. The data analysis will be completed by September, 1997. The results of the meta-analysis will reveal the overall effect of death education, identify the nurses who experienced the largest reduction in death anxiety as a result of their participation in a death education program, and describe the specific circumstances under which death education has the greatest effect on nurses' death anxiety.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects Of Death Education On Nurses' Death Anxiety Levelsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWaddell, Donnaen_US
dc.author.detailsDonna Waddell, EdD, Assistant Professor, North Georgia College and State University Department of Nursing, Dahlonega, Georgia, USA, email: dwaddell@nugget.ngc.peachnet.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165905-
dc.description.abstractFor over two decades researchers have investigated the relationship between death education and nurses' death anxiety levels. The hypothesis tested was that death education reduced death anxiety levels and, therefore, improved nursing practice with terminally and critically ill patients. However, the results of these primary studies have been inconsistent. It is difficult to arrive at any compelling conclusions about the benefits of death education with a narrative review of the published research. Therefore, a meta-analysis of the published and unpublished research done to date was conducted to determine the extent to which death education decreases nurses' death anxiety levels and identify any mediating factors, such as demographics of the subjects, characteristics of the death education program, and circumstances under which death education programs are offered. The units of analysis were the primary research studies which met the following inclusion criteria: a) death education was implemented as a treatment, b) death anxiety was the dependent variable, c) subjects were registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs), or RN or LPN students, d) enough data was given to compute an effect size. The search for studies meeting these criteria was conducted for more than a year. Search methodologies included computer searches of CINAHL, MEDLINE, PSYCHLIT, and SSCI, Dissertation Abstracts International, and Masters Theses Abstracts International databases; ancestry; decendency; posting notices on the relevant internet bulletin boards; and formal and informal networking with researchers in the field of death education. The search is concluding at this time and 60 studies meeting the inclusion criteria have been located and coded. The array of studies span more than 20 years of research and is international in scope. Data analysis will include computing an effect size for each primary study, averaging the overall effect size, and, using nonparametric correlational procedures, conducting subanalyses for mediating effects. The data analysis will be completed by September, 1997. The results of the meta-analysis will reveal the overall effect of death education, identify the nurses who experienced the largest reduction in death anxiety as a result of their participation in a death education program, and describe the specific circumstances under which death education has the greatest effect on nurses' death anxiety.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:36:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:36:11Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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