The Movement Into Caring: How Student Nurses Develop Emotionally Responsive Relationships

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165908
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Movement Into Caring: How Student Nurses Develop Emotionally Responsive Relationships
Author(s):
Crigger, Nancy
Author Details:
Nancy Crigger, PhD, Assistant Professor, Purdue University School of Nursing, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA, email: criggen@purdue.edu
Abstract:
Implications: Nurses who develop an emotional responsive relationship with their clients are more motivated and more satisfied with their nursing experience. Lack of emotional responsiveness toward others contributes to burnout and loss of job satisfaction. With a better understanding of how one develops emotionally responsive relationships, nurse educators can develop educational programs to help student nurses develop their caring capacity. Purpose: The study purpose was to explore and describe the process that students use to develop an emotionally responsive relationship with the clients assigned in their clinical experiences. Research Question: What factors contribute to or inhibit a nursing student's ability to emotionally relate to a client? Participants: Eleven junior and senior baccalaureate nursing students with diverse backgrounds participated in the study. Participants were selected to represent differing educations, cultural backgrounds, religious affiliations, marital status, sex and age. Method: A descriptive-exploratory method was used. After obtaining informed consent, participants were asked to describe a clinical situation in which they became emotionally involved or 'cared' for the assigned client. The interviews were tape recorded, transcribed and analyzed. Results: Eight categories emerged from the analyzed data. The process of developing an emotional responsiveness did not occur with all clients. The process described by participants in this study was similar to the process described by Noddings in her theory of care. Sensory cues, degree of need, similarities between student and client and the student's comfort level were significant factors identified by the student nurses interviewed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Movement Into Caring: How Student Nurses Develop Emotionally Responsive Relationshipsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCrigger, Nancyen_US
dc.author.detailsNancy Crigger, PhD, Assistant Professor, Purdue University School of Nursing, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA, email: criggen@purdue.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165908-
dc.description.abstractImplications: Nurses who develop an emotional responsive relationship with their clients are more motivated and more satisfied with their nursing experience. Lack of emotional responsiveness toward others contributes to burnout and loss of job satisfaction. With a better understanding of how one develops emotionally responsive relationships, nurse educators can develop educational programs to help student nurses develop their caring capacity. Purpose: The study purpose was to explore and describe the process that students use to develop an emotionally responsive relationship with the clients assigned in their clinical experiences. Research Question: What factors contribute to or inhibit a nursing student's ability to emotionally relate to a client? Participants: Eleven junior and senior baccalaureate nursing students with diverse backgrounds participated in the study. Participants were selected to represent differing educations, cultural backgrounds, religious affiliations, marital status, sex and age. Method: A descriptive-exploratory method was used. After obtaining informed consent, participants were asked to describe a clinical situation in which they became emotionally involved or 'cared' for the assigned client. The interviews were tape recorded, transcribed and analyzed. Results: Eight categories emerged from the analyzed data. The process of developing an emotional responsiveness did not occur with all clients. The process described by participants in this study was similar to the process described by Noddings in her theory of care. Sensory cues, degree of need, similarities between student and client and the student's comfort level were significant factors identified by the student nurses interviewed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:36:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:36:15Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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