2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165909
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quality Of Life Experienced By People With Cancer
Author(s):
Yoder, Linda
Author Details:
Linda Yoder, PhD, Brooke Army Medical Center, Nursing Research Service, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, USA, (updated February 2015) email: lyoder@mail.nur.utexas.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine Quality of Life (QOL) experienced by cancer patients receiving care in a military setting. Roy's Conceptual Model of Adaptation was used as a framework to guide the research. The research questions are: * What is the variation in QOL experienced by cancer patients under various treatment conditions? * What components of QOL are rated as most important by the patients? * What is the relationship between demographic characteristics and QOL scores? * What is the utility of previously described QOL instruments with demonstrated reliability and validity in a military setting? Method: This study consists of a descriptive, prospective, repeated measures design. Patients are asked to complete two questionnaires (CARES & Daily Activity Sheet) at two month intervals over six months. Karnofsky Performance Scale and demographic data were also collected. Preliminary Results: The sample consisted of 195 subjects in the following diagnostic groups: breast cancer (73), females with other cancers (43), prostate cancer (26) and males with other cancers (53). Preliminary data from the breast cancer subset demonstrated that 40-75% of patients reported problems with functional activities such as having energy, doing household chores and lifting. Cognition difficulties consisted of 63% having difficulty "remembering things," 35% experienced difficulty thinking clearly and 40% had problems concentrating. Reported emotional issues were nervousness about coming to the hospital, having diagnostic tests, and getting test results (52-66%), having body image problems (46%) and feeling "frequently" anxious, depressed, or angry (43-60%). Sleep difficulties and frequent pain were issues for 50% of respondents, with 20% reporting pain that was not controlled by medication. Altered sexuality was an issue for 48% of the women, who reported diminished sexual activity/desire. Interestingly, 44% reported not feeling "sexually attractive." Chemotherapy/radiation therapy side effects, insurance/financial problems and dealings with health professionals were not areas of concern. To date, data were analyzed using frequencies and measures of central tendency. Analysis of variance will be used to assess variability over time within subjects, as well as describe variation between subjects. The mean scores of questionnaire subscales will be reported across subjects and time, and relationships between demographic variables and QOL questionnaire scores will be examined. Conclusions: Nurses have a key role in assessing patients, planning for interventions, and assisting patients to reach their fullest potential. This study will help identify the different aspects of QOL that most affect cancer patients in a military medical center. It will also help identify patients with a cancer diagnosis who are at most risk of experiencing a disruption in their quality of life.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuality Of Life Experienced By People With Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorYoder, Lindaen_US
dc.author.detailsLinda Yoder, PhD, Brooke Army Medical Center, Nursing Research Service, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, USA, (updated February 2015) email: lyoder@mail.nur.utexas.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165909-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to examine Quality of Life (QOL) experienced by cancer patients receiving care in a military setting. Roy's Conceptual Model of Adaptation was used as a framework to guide the research. The research questions are: * What is the variation in QOL experienced by cancer patients under various treatment conditions? * What components of QOL are rated as most important by the patients? * What is the relationship between demographic characteristics and QOL scores? * What is the utility of previously described QOL instruments with demonstrated reliability and validity in a military setting? Method: This study consists of a descriptive, prospective, repeated measures design. Patients are asked to complete two questionnaires (CARES & Daily Activity Sheet) at two month intervals over six months. Karnofsky Performance Scale and demographic data were also collected. Preliminary Results: The sample consisted of 195 subjects in the following diagnostic groups: breast cancer (73), females with other cancers (43), prostate cancer (26) and males with other cancers (53). Preliminary data from the breast cancer subset demonstrated that 40-75% of patients reported problems with functional activities such as having energy, doing household chores and lifting. Cognition difficulties consisted of 63% having difficulty "remembering things," 35% experienced difficulty thinking clearly and 40% had problems concentrating. Reported emotional issues were nervousness about coming to the hospital, having diagnostic tests, and getting test results (52-66%), having body image problems (46%) and feeling "frequently" anxious, depressed, or angry (43-60%). Sleep difficulties and frequent pain were issues for 50% of respondents, with 20% reporting pain that was not controlled by medication. Altered sexuality was an issue for 48% of the women, who reported diminished sexual activity/desire. Interestingly, 44% reported not feeling "sexually attractive." Chemotherapy/radiation therapy side effects, insurance/financial problems and dealings with health professionals were not areas of concern. To date, data were analyzed using frequencies and measures of central tendency. Analysis of variance will be used to assess variability over time within subjects, as well as describe variation between subjects. The mean scores of questionnaire subscales will be reported across subjects and time, and relationships between demographic variables and QOL questionnaire scores will be examined. Conclusions: Nurses have a key role in assessing patients, planning for interventions, and assisting patients to reach their fullest potential. This study will help identify the different aspects of QOL that most affect cancer patients in a military medical center. It will also help identify patients with a cancer diagnosis who are at most risk of experiencing a disruption in their quality of life.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:36:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:36:16Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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