2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165913
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Adolescent Care With Research: Examining Risks Of Tattooing
Author(s):
Armstrong, Myrna
Author Details:
Myrna Armstrong, Ed.D, Associate Professor, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Nursing, Lubbock, Texas, USA, email: sonmla@ttuhsc.edu
Abstract:
Identification of Problem and Significance Tattooing, indelible marks produced by multiple punctures of pigment(s) into the skin, is a flourishing, invasive procedure in adolescents with the potential of blood-borne disease. Adolescents often realize that certain actions are risky, yet, they still engage in the behavior because they perceive certain psychosocial value associated with the behavior. Today, tattooing prevalence is on the rise with estimates of adult tattooing ranging from 3 to 20 million of the US population. The 1996 Business Guide states tattoo studios are the fifth fastest growing business in the nation. Studio tattoos are created by non-licensed personnel, in a non-regulated environment, using non-FDA approved pigments. Amateur tattooing continues, often initiated by adolescents, using clean/dirty instruments (pens, needles & other homemade devices), pigments (India ink, charcoal, soot, mascara), in unhygienic conditions and environments with more health and psychological risks. Presently there are no national studies about tattooing in adolescents, nor information published about tattooing interest Is tattooing another adolescent risk behavior with potential complications? Purpose: The purpose was to identify characteristics of tattooed adolescents, their decision-making and experiences, as well as purchase, possession and/or health risks in order to develop applicable health education for informed decision-making. Methodology This study surveyed students in 8 high schools across the United States (N=2, 101) using a 72-item self-reporting, anonymous tool based on a review of literature, personal interviews, pilot study data and three previous studies with established face and content validity; Twelve Likert scale questions asked about the purpose of their tattoo. The range of reliability for this scale, using Cronbach's Alpha, was .89-.90. Results Findings document a 55% interest in tattooing and a 10% rate of tattooing. The average age for tattooing was 14 years of age. Limited gang affiliation was described and 60% of the students report their academic grades as A's and B's. Strong needs for self-identity and peer relationships were illustrated by their independent decision making with limited parental involvement, their need "to be myself, don't need to impress anyone anymore" (81%), and their large peer support for their tattoos. Conclusion and Implications Comparing the findings from this study with a similar study conducted in one-state three years ago, consistent, and concerting findings are present. This replicated profile of interested, and tattooed, adolescents suggests a strong need for tattooing to be added to the growing lists of previously ignored, important public educational issues. Health education needs to begin around the 5th grade.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Adolescent Care With Research: Examining Risks Of Tattooingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorArmstrong, Myrnaen_US
dc.author.detailsMyrna Armstrong, Ed.D, Associate Professor, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Nursing, Lubbock, Texas, USA, email: sonmla@ttuhsc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165913-
dc.description.abstractIdentification of Problem and Significance Tattooing, indelible marks produced by multiple punctures of pigment(s) into the skin, is a flourishing, invasive procedure in adolescents with the potential of blood-borne disease. Adolescents often realize that certain actions are risky, yet, they still engage in the behavior because they perceive certain psychosocial value associated with the behavior. Today, tattooing prevalence is on the rise with estimates of adult tattooing ranging from 3 to 20 million of the US population. The 1996 Business Guide states tattoo studios are the fifth fastest growing business in the nation. Studio tattoos are created by non-licensed personnel, in a non-regulated environment, using non-FDA approved pigments. Amateur tattooing continues, often initiated by adolescents, using clean/dirty instruments (pens, needles & other homemade devices), pigments (India ink, charcoal, soot, mascara), in unhygienic conditions and environments with more health and psychological risks. Presently there are no national studies about tattooing in adolescents, nor information published about tattooing interest Is tattooing another adolescent risk behavior with potential complications? Purpose: The purpose was to identify characteristics of tattooed adolescents, their decision-making and experiences, as well as purchase, possession and/or health risks in order to develop applicable health education for informed decision-making. Methodology This study surveyed students in 8 high schools across the United States (N=2, 101) using a 72-item self-reporting, anonymous tool based on a review of literature, personal interviews, pilot study data and three previous studies with established face and content validity; Twelve Likert scale questions asked about the purpose of their tattoo. The range of reliability for this scale, using Cronbach's Alpha, was .89-.90. Results Findings document a 55% interest in tattooing and a 10% rate of tattooing. The average age for tattooing was 14 years of age. Limited gang affiliation was described and 60% of the students report their academic grades as A's and B's. Strong needs for self-identity and peer relationships were illustrated by their independent decision making with limited parental involvement, their need "to be myself, don't need to impress anyone anymore" (81%), and their large peer support for their tattoos. Conclusion and Implications Comparing the findings from this study with a similar study conducted in one-state three years ago, consistent, and concerting findings are present. This replicated profile of interested, and tattooed, adolescents suggests a strong need for tattooing to be added to the growing lists of previously ignored, important public educational issues. Health education needs to begin around the 5th grade.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:36:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:36:21Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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