2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165914
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Menstrual Attitudes Of Pre-adolescent Girls
Author(s):
Lieser, Carol
Author Details:
Carol Lieser, MSN, University of Texas at Arlington School of Nursing, Arlington, Texas, USA, email: clieser@uta.edu
Abstract:
Menstrual attitudes, whether positive or negative, can influence a girl's ability to assume her role as a woman. However, measuring menstrual attitudes has been difficult due to the lack of a reliable and valid instrument. Thus, the purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to determine the reliability of the Adolescent Menstrual Attitude Questionnaire (AMAQ); to examine differences between pre- and post- menarcheal girls' menstrual attitudes; and to identify relationships among demographic variables, developmental variables and menstrual attitudes. The AMAQ was administered to 58 postmenarcheal and 260 premenarcheal girls, who were in 4th, 5th, and 6th grade public school classes. Demographic and developmental data were obtained from these girls and 339 of their caregivers. The girls and their caregivers were predominately from low socioeconomic status and minority Hispanic (40.1%), African American (30.7%), and Asian (2.7%) ethnic groups, with 22.4% Caucasian. The total instrument, divided into two versions (premenarcheal girls, AMAQ-pre, r = 0.8 and postmenarcheal girls, AMAQ-post, r = 0.7), showed reliability. Of the six subscales of the AMAQ, only positive feelings (AMAQpre, r= 0.77; AMAQ-post, r = 0.74) and negative feelings (AMAQ-pre, r = 0.73 and AMAQ-post, r = 0.65) showed acceptable reliability for a new instrument. The AMAQ is a 58 item, Likert type instrument with possible range of scores of 58 - 290. Higher scores reflect more positive attitudes. The mean score for premenarcheal girls was 147 and for postmenarcheal was 151. Significant differences were found between postmenarcheal and premenarcheal girls' attitudes (p = 0.036). AMAQ scores were correlated with selected demographic and developmental data. The premenarcheal girls' attitudes correlated significantly with grade level: negative subscale (r = 0.15), total AMAQ score (r = 0.17); social age: total score (r = 0.14); ethnicity: positive subscale (F 4.43, p .01) negative subscale (F 2.30, p .05) and total AMAQ score (F 3.92, p .01); religion: positive subscale (F 6.42, p .001) and total AMAQ score (F 4.52, p. .001); primary language of the caregiver: negative subscale (F 3.38, p .01); and primary language of the girl: positive subscale (F 4.22, p .01). No significant correlations were found for postmenarcheal girls attitudes. This study lends a better understanding of the AMAQ attitude instrument. The study indicates that further development of the AMAQ is needed. Future research can focus on factor analysis to enhance content validity, a more indepth look at the individual ethnicities' attitudes, and determination of the predictors of menstrual attitudes of young girls using regression analysis. Eventually interventions may be studied to determine how to optimize positive menstrual attitudes for preadolescent girls.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMenstrual Attitudes Of Pre-adolescent Girlsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLieser, Carolen_US
dc.author.detailsCarol Lieser, MSN, University of Texas at Arlington School of Nursing, Arlington, Texas, USA, email: clieser@uta.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165914-
dc.description.abstractMenstrual attitudes, whether positive or negative, can influence a girl's ability to assume her role as a woman. However, measuring menstrual attitudes has been difficult due to the lack of a reliable and valid instrument. Thus, the purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to determine the reliability of the Adolescent Menstrual Attitude Questionnaire (AMAQ); to examine differences between pre- and post- menarcheal girls' menstrual attitudes; and to identify relationships among demographic variables, developmental variables and menstrual attitudes. The AMAQ was administered to 58 postmenarcheal and 260 premenarcheal girls, who were in 4th, 5th, and 6th grade public school classes. Demographic and developmental data were obtained from these girls and 339 of their caregivers. The girls and their caregivers were predominately from low socioeconomic status and minority Hispanic (40.1%), African American (30.7%), and Asian (2.7%) ethnic groups, with 22.4% Caucasian. The total instrument, divided into two versions (premenarcheal girls, AMAQ-pre, r = 0.8 and postmenarcheal girls, AMAQ-post, r = 0.7), showed reliability. Of the six subscales of the AMAQ, only positive feelings (AMAQpre, r= 0.77; AMAQ-post, r = 0.74) and negative feelings (AMAQ-pre, r = 0.73 and AMAQ-post, r = 0.65) showed acceptable reliability for a new instrument. The AMAQ is a 58 item, Likert type instrument with possible range of scores of 58 - 290. Higher scores reflect more positive attitudes. The mean score for premenarcheal girls was 147 and for postmenarcheal was 151. Significant differences were found between postmenarcheal and premenarcheal girls' attitudes (p = 0.036). AMAQ scores were correlated with selected demographic and developmental data. The premenarcheal girls' attitudes correlated significantly with grade level: negative subscale (r = 0.15), total AMAQ score (r = 0.17); social age: total score (r = 0.14); ethnicity: positive subscale (F 4.43, p .01) negative subscale (F 2.30, p .05) and total AMAQ score (F 3.92, p .01); religion: positive subscale (F 6.42, p .001) and total AMAQ score (F 4.52, p. .001); primary language of the caregiver: negative subscale (F 3.38, p .01); and primary language of the girl: positive subscale (F 4.22, p .01). No significant correlations were found for postmenarcheal girls attitudes. This study lends a better understanding of the AMAQ attitude instrument. The study indicates that further development of the AMAQ is needed. Future research can focus on factor analysis to enhance content validity, a more indepth look at the individual ethnicities' attitudes, and determination of the predictors of menstrual attitudes of young girls using regression analysis. Eventually interventions may be studied to determine how to optimize positive menstrual attitudes for preadolescent girls.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:36:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:36:22Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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